The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Cobrand personality evaluation: the role of dialectical self

Cobrand personality evaluation: the role of dialectical self
Cobrand personality evaluation: the role of dialectical self
The rapid growth of Chinese market has encouraged many Western brands collaborate with Chinese brands through cobranding strategy. Brand managers often face the challenges of selecting the one who may carry a distinct brand personality on the basis of a potential low level of perceived fit. This research builds on Monga and Lau-Gesk (2007), proposes dialectical self - captures East Asians' cognitive tolerance of conflicts, ambiguities and inconsistencies in self-concept domain, is an individual difference variable that may explains East Asian consumers' attitudinal differences toward a cobrand who may have traits associated with more brand personalities. Four experiments were conducted with the data from both China and Thailand. The results show that perceived fit mediates the negative relationship between dialectical self and cobrand evaluation. More importantly, the effects of dialectical self are also moderated by one's acculturation experience. As immigration and globalization are two forms of acculturation, the effects of dialectical self are only evidenced within immigration-based acculturation group.
brand personality, acculturation experience, dialectical self
Chinese Scholar Marketing Association
Wang, Weisha
3b06920a-f578-41b8-a356-7e2da53d3bf6
Wang, Weisha
3b06920a-f578-41b8-a356-7e2da53d3bf6

Wang, Weisha (2018) Cobrand personality evaluation: the role of dialectical self. In Proceedings of 2018 China Marketing International Conference: : Marketing Strategy in the Sharing Economy: Localization and Globalization. Chinese Scholar Marketing Association..

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The rapid growth of Chinese market has encouraged many Western brands collaborate with Chinese brands through cobranding strategy. Brand managers often face the challenges of selecting the one who may carry a distinct brand personality on the basis of a potential low level of perceived fit. This research builds on Monga and Lau-Gesk (2007), proposes dialectical self - captures East Asians' cognitive tolerance of conflicts, ambiguities and inconsistencies in self-concept domain, is an individual difference variable that may explains East Asian consumers' attitudinal differences toward a cobrand who may have traits associated with more brand personalities. Four experiments were conducted with the data from both China and Thailand. The results show that perceived fit mediates the negative relationship between dialectical self and cobrand evaluation. More importantly, the effects of dialectical self are also moderated by one's acculturation experience. As immigration and globalization are two forms of acculturation, the effects of dialectical self are only evidenced within immigration-based acculturation group.

This record has no associated files available for download.

More information

Published date: 22 June 2018
Keywords: brand personality, acculturation experience, dialectical self

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424376
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424376
PURE UUID: af1ee6b0-a656-4616-bac7-540ebd9def55
ORCID for Weisha Wang: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-2985-3416

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:36
Last modified: 10 Nov 2021 03:36

Export record

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×