The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Adherence to a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-type diet over the life course and associated vascular function: a study based on the MRC 1946 British birth cohort

Adherence to a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-type diet over the life course and associated vascular function: a study based on the MRC 1946 British birth cohort
Adherence to a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-type diet over the life course and associated vascular function: a study based on the MRC 1946 British birth cohort

Little is known about long-term associations between the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and conventional cardiovascular (CV)-risk factors as well as novel measures of vascular function. This study aimed to examine whether long-term adherence to a DASH-type diet in a British birth cohort is associated with conventional CV-risk factors and two vascular function markers, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV). Data came from 1409 participants of the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development. Dietary intake was assessed at 36, 43, 53 and 60-64 years using 5-d estimated food diaries. The DASH-type diet score was calculated using the Fung index. Conventional CV-risk factors (blood pressure (BP) and lipids), cIMT in the right and/or left common carotid artery and PWV was measured when participants were 60-64 years. Associations between the DASH-type diet score and outcomes were assessed using multiple regression models adjusted for socioeconomic position, BMI, smoking and physical activity. Participants in higher sex-specific quintiles (Q) of the long-term DASH-type diet had lower BP (P≤0·08), higher HDL-cholesterol (P<0·001) and lower TAG (P<0·001) compared with people in Q1. Participants in Q5 of the long-term DASH-type diet had lower PWV (-0·28 sd; 95 % CI -0·50, -0·07, P trend=0·01) and cIMT (-0·24 sd; 95 % CI -0·44, -0·04, P trend=0·02) compared with participants in the Q1. This association was independent of the conventional CV-risk factors. Greater adherence to a DASH diet over the life course is associated with conventional CV-risk factors and independently associated with cIMT and PWV.

British birth cohort, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, Life course epidemiology, Vascular function
0007-1145
581-589
Maddock, Jane
bf317b78-3d2b-4f9f-b861-10e001dfbbf6
Ziauddeen, Nida
3ad67dd8-26ba-498a-af0a-b1174298995b
Ambrosini, Gina L.
7d520925-1231-4cb2-af6c-690648984ad7
Wong, Andrew
64a5fd30-a16e-4fba-a4d9-8d3fffeaa8f9
Hardy, Rebecca
99fecbaf-fc92-4354-aa02-cb904dd2bd32
Ray, Sumantra
3ffd0745-148f-4a89-b255-7fcaba5591de
Maddock, Jane
bf317b78-3d2b-4f9f-b861-10e001dfbbf6
Ziauddeen, Nida
3ad67dd8-26ba-498a-af0a-b1174298995b
Ambrosini, Gina L.
7d520925-1231-4cb2-af6c-690648984ad7
Wong, Andrew
64a5fd30-a16e-4fba-a4d9-8d3fffeaa8f9
Hardy, Rebecca
99fecbaf-fc92-4354-aa02-cb904dd2bd32
Ray, Sumantra
3ffd0745-148f-4a89-b255-7fcaba5591de

Maddock, Jane, Ziauddeen, Nida, Ambrosini, Gina L., Wong, Andrew, Hardy, Rebecca and Ray, Sumantra (2018) Adherence to a Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)-type diet over the life course and associated vascular function: a study based on the MRC 1946 British birth cohort. British Journal of Nutrition, 119 (5), 581-589. (doi:10.1017/S0007114517003877).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Little is known about long-term associations between the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet and conventional cardiovascular (CV)-risk factors as well as novel measures of vascular function. This study aimed to examine whether long-term adherence to a DASH-type diet in a British birth cohort is associated with conventional CV-risk factors and two vascular function markers, carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV). Data came from 1409 participants of the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development. Dietary intake was assessed at 36, 43, 53 and 60-64 years using 5-d estimated food diaries. The DASH-type diet score was calculated using the Fung index. Conventional CV-risk factors (blood pressure (BP) and lipids), cIMT in the right and/or left common carotid artery and PWV was measured when participants were 60-64 years. Associations between the DASH-type diet score and outcomes were assessed using multiple regression models adjusted for socioeconomic position, BMI, smoking and physical activity. Participants in higher sex-specific quintiles (Q) of the long-term DASH-type diet had lower BP (P≤0·08), higher HDL-cholesterol (P<0·001) and lower TAG (P<0·001) compared with people in Q1. Participants in Q5 of the long-term DASH-type diet had lower PWV (-0·28 sd; 95 % CI -0·50, -0·07, P trend=0·01) and cIMT (-0·24 sd; 95 % CI -0·44, -0·04, P trend=0·02) compared with participants in the Q1. This association was independent of the conventional CV-risk factors. Greater adherence to a DASH diet over the life course is associated with conventional CV-risk factors and independently associated with cIMT and PWV.

Text
adherence_to_a_dietary - Version of Record
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.
Download (380kB)

More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 6 March 2018
Published date: 14 March 2018
Keywords: British birth cohort, Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet, Life course epidemiology, Vascular function

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424626
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424626
ISSN: 0007-1145
PURE UUID: 2fcd214a-040a-41be-880c-788017228e1a

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:39
Last modified: 16 Dec 2019 18:01

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Jane Maddock
Author: Nida Ziauddeen
Author: Gina L. Ambrosini
Author: Andrew Wong
Author: Rebecca Hardy
Author: Sumantra Ray

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×