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Childhood bullying and paranoid thinking

Childhood bullying and paranoid thinking
Childhood bullying and paranoid thinking
Childhood bullying is associated with a wide variety of adverse consequences, including psychological distress and psychopathology. In this paper, the literature investigating the association between being bullied by peers in childhood and negative outcomes in adulthood will be reviewed and evaluated. Previous research largely utilising retrospective measures of bullying have found a consistent association between being bullied in childhood and experiencing a range of adverse effects in adulthood, particularly depression, body image dissatisfaction and low self-esteem. However, there are numerous methodological limitations to bullying research, including a lack of consensus over defining and measuring bullying, failure to investigate moderating or mediating variables, over-reliance on female and undergraduate populations and a lack of longitudinal research to establish if the association between being bullied in childhood and experiencing adverse consequences in adulthood is causal. Recommendations for future empirical investigations and the implications for clinical practice are suggested.
University of Southampton
Ashford, Christian
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Ashford, Christian
fd6457a6-bfc7-4760-8d03-d382d52269e0
Maguire, Nicholas
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Ashcroft, Katie
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Ashford, Christian (2010) Childhood bullying and paranoid thinking. University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 148pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Childhood bullying is associated with a wide variety of adverse consequences, including psychological distress and psychopathology. In this paper, the literature investigating the association between being bullied by peers in childhood and negative outcomes in adulthood will be reviewed and evaluated. Previous research largely utilising retrospective measures of bullying have found a consistent association between being bullied in childhood and experiencing a range of adverse effects in adulthood, particularly depression, body image dissatisfaction and low self-esteem. However, there are numerous methodological limitations to bullying research, including a lack of consensus over defining and measuring bullying, failure to investigate moderating or mediating variables, over-reliance on female and undergraduate populations and a lack of longitudinal research to establish if the association between being bullied in childhood and experiencing adverse consequences in adulthood is causal. Recommendations for future empirical investigations and the implications for clinical practice are suggested.

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Thesis Christian Ashford - Version of Record
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Published date: July 2010

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424649
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424649
PURE UUID: f6412b70-1feb-47a2-922e-9fd2cc3c4079
ORCID for Nicholas Maguire: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4295-8068

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:39
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:47

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Contributors

Author: Christian Ashford
Thesis advisor: Nicholas Maguire ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Katie Ashcroft

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