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ECZEMA Psychological interventions for atopic eczema. Educating parents about atopic eczema can help them to cope with their child's disease

Ersser, S. (2006) ECZEMA Psychological interventions for atopic eczema. Educating parents about atopic eczema can help them to cope with their child's disease MIMS Dermatology, 2, (3), p.25.

Record type: Article

Abstract

KEY POINTS Atopic eczema affects up to 15 per cent of schoolchildren and can have a signficant impact on quality of life. Psychological approaches can help parents to break the itch-scratch cycle and improve treatment adherence. Educational videos and other media can be useful. Improving parents' confidence in the treatment is beneficial. Teaching relaxation techniques can lower stress.
The itchy rash of atopic eczema is a major problem for children and their parents. Psychological and educational interventions have been used to complement medication in helping to manage the condition, by promotion relatxation and helping parents and children to understand the condition and their role in its effective management. Parents need support on breaking the itch-scratch cycle, reducing stress and improving adherence.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: atopic eczema, psychological, children, itch-scratch cycle, parents

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 42468
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/42468
PURE UUID: bf823b73-3d4a-4f74-b124-8648adc0cb9e

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Dec 2006
Last modified: 17 Jul 2017 15:21

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