The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Management of Powerline Easement Vegetation for Small Mammal Conservation in Australia: A Case Study of the Broad-toothed Rat (Mastacomys fuscus)

Management of Powerline Easement Vegetation for Small Mammal Conservation in Australia: A Case Study of the Broad-toothed Rat (Mastacomys fuscus)
Management of Powerline Easement Vegetation for Small Mammal Conservation in Australia: A Case Study of the Broad-toothed Rat (Mastacomys fuscus)
This chapter examines the potential power line easements for the conservation of small mammals, and in particular the near-threatened, broad-toothed rat (Mastacomys fuscus), in Australia. This chapter highlights that potential biodiversity values do exist for Australian power line easements, if some changes are made to the current management practices. Easement vegetation is found to support a diverse small mammal community, including M. fuscus if the vegetation is allowed to develop some structural complexity. M. fuscus was one of the first species to recolonize the easement habitat, provided that the areas had regenerated to a sufficient level. Results suggests, however, that the current management technique used, where the entire easement is managed at one time via mass slashing, on short rotation times, is most likely limiting M. fuscus to low abundances, and causing isolation of the current M. fuscus populations. To ensure that power line easements supply functional, usable habitat for small mammals and other species and to minimize their potential to fragment small mammal populations, it is recommended that current management techniques be reassessed. In an effort to develop more appropriate management regimes, it was recommended that rotation times be increased between management, that mass slashing of the easement at one time be reassessed, especially in naturally low growing areas and that rotational-type slashing be implemented. Other techniques such as spot spraying may be all that is needed within some areas to control emergent saplings.
467-477
Clarke, Donna
f5db577c-32e8-400f-8b1c-c7adf8b00e91
White, John
c967b7f1-6cb1-40a0-b71c-773225dd94a5
Clarke, Donna
f5db577c-32e8-400f-8b1c-c7adf8b00e91
White, John
c967b7f1-6cb1-40a0-b71c-773225dd94a5

Clarke, Donna and White, John (2008) Management of Powerline Easement Vegetation for Small Mammal Conservation in Australia: A Case Study of the Broad-toothed Rat (Mastacomys fuscus). Environmental Concerns in Rights-of-Way Management: 8th International Symposium, Saratoga Springs, United States. 12 - 16 Sep 2004. pp. 467-477 . (doi:10.1016/B978-044453223-7.50057-5).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

This chapter examines the potential power line easements for the conservation of small mammals, and in particular the near-threatened, broad-toothed rat (Mastacomys fuscus), in Australia. This chapter highlights that potential biodiversity values do exist for Australian power line easements, if some changes are made to the current management practices. Easement vegetation is found to support a diverse small mammal community, including M. fuscus if the vegetation is allowed to develop some structural complexity. M. fuscus was one of the first species to recolonize the easement habitat, provided that the areas had regenerated to a sufficient level. Results suggests, however, that the current management technique used, where the entire easement is managed at one time via mass slashing, on short rotation times, is most likely limiting M. fuscus to low abundances, and causing isolation of the current M. fuscus populations. To ensure that power line easements supply functional, usable habitat for small mammals and other species and to minimize their potential to fragment small mammal populations, it is recommended that current management techniques be reassessed. In an effort to develop more appropriate management regimes, it was recommended that rotation times be increased between management, that mass slashing of the easement at one time be reassessed, especially in naturally low growing areas and that rotational-type slashing be implemented. Other techniques such as spot spraying may be all that is needed within some areas to control emergent saplings.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Published date: 2008
Venue - Dates: Environmental Concerns in Rights-of-Way Management: 8th International Symposium, Saratoga Springs, United States, 2004-09-12 - 2004-09-16

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424698
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424698
PURE UUID: 6fdb5392-61a1-43b6-b7d0-e1303e6da26d

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:41
Last modified: 05 Oct 2018 11:41

Export record

Altmetrics

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×