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Police middle management leadership: A case of arrested development?

Police middle management leadership: A case of arrested development?
Police middle management leadership: A case of arrested development?
Leadership and leadership development in the modern police service has been regularly reviewed under successive government reform agendas. To date there has been no robust evaluative study in the UK policing context of the effectiveness of particular leadership styles or of leadership development programmes. This research evaluates a Hampshire Constabulary leadership development programme for middle managers, namely police Sergeants, and studies the broader aspects of leadership development at this middle management level, focusing on the knowledge, understanding and skills required to apply leadership in the contemporary policing context and as defined by the Hampshire Constabulary Leadership Charter.

The case study used one-to-one interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders involved in the leadership training and development of police officer middle managers: a cohort of officers at different stages both before and after the Leadership and Management Programme (First Line Manager - Level 1); their subordinates and line managers; training staff; the Hampshire Constabulary Leadership and Professional Development Manager; and Chief Constable. The fieldwork was supported by documentary analysis of relevant training material and national reports.

Three main themes emerged that advance leadership and leadership development theory in the policing context: a trait-based skills model of leadership which was supported by the terms of the Constabulary’s Leadership Charter; the police officer middle manager as ‘intermediary’ between frontline practitioners and senior management; and the positive relationship between factors which enhance police officer middle manager performance and their perceived leadership self-efficacy. The ability to effectively manage emotions is also key to effective police middle management leadership performance.

A framework for a detailed model of effective leadership development for police officers at middle management level is proposed which recognises their influential role in supporting staff and managing organisational change during a period of wider public sector reform.
University of Southampton
Clapham, Sarah Louise
3ac91870-1b76-483b-94f5-162e59072a84
Clapham, Sarah Louise
3ac91870-1b76-483b-94f5-162e59072a84
Muijs, Roland
62af2eff-0cb5-403b-81cc-7a3bfb3e640e

Clapham, Sarah Louise (2018) Police middle management leadership: A case of arrested development? University of Southampton, Doctoral Thesis, 314pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

Leadership and leadership development in the modern police service has been regularly reviewed under successive government reform agendas. To date there has been no robust evaluative study in the UK policing context of the effectiveness of particular leadership styles or of leadership development programmes. This research evaluates a Hampshire Constabulary leadership development programme for middle managers, namely police Sergeants, and studies the broader aspects of leadership development at this middle management level, focusing on the knowledge, understanding and skills required to apply leadership in the contemporary policing context and as defined by the Hampshire Constabulary Leadership Charter.

The case study used one-to-one interviews and focus groups with key stakeholders involved in the leadership training and development of police officer middle managers: a cohort of officers at different stages both before and after the Leadership and Management Programme (First Line Manager - Level 1); their subordinates and line managers; training staff; the Hampshire Constabulary Leadership and Professional Development Manager; and Chief Constable. The fieldwork was supported by documentary analysis of relevant training material and national reports.

Three main themes emerged that advance leadership and leadership development theory in the policing context: a trait-based skills model of leadership which was supported by the terms of the Constabulary’s Leadership Charter; the police officer middle manager as ‘intermediary’ between frontline practitioners and senior management; and the positive relationship between factors which enhance police officer middle manager performance and their perceived leadership self-efficacy. The ability to effectively manage emotions is also key to effective police middle management leadership performance.

A framework for a detailed model of effective leadership development for police officers at middle management level is proposed which recognises their influential role in supporting staff and managing organisational change during a period of wider public sector reform.

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Published date: October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424731
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424731
PURE UUID: b2550678-c8ed-44e4-8311-b46c09ec87da
ORCID for Roland Muijs: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0131-8921

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:41
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:37

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