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Potential for offsetting diamond mine carbon emissions through mineral carbonation of processed kimberlite: an assessment of De Beers mine sites in South Africa and Canada

Potential for offsetting diamond mine carbon emissions through mineral carbonation of processed kimberlite: an assessment of De Beers mine sites in South Africa and Canada
Potential for offsetting diamond mine carbon emissions through mineral carbonation of processed kimberlite: an assessment of De Beers mine sites in South Africa and Canada

De Beers kimberlite mine operations in South Africa (Venetia and Voorspoed) and Canada (Gahcho Kué, Victor, and Snap Lake) have the potential to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) through weathering of kimberlite mine tailings, which can store carbon in secondary carbonate minerals (mineral carbonation). Carbonation of ca. 4.7 to 24.0 wt% (average = 13.8 wt%) of annual processed kimberlite production could offset 100% of each mine site’s carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions. Minerals of particular interest for reactivity with atmospheric or waste CO2 from energy production include serpentine minerals, olivine (forsterite), brucite, and smectite. The most abundant minerals, such as serpentine polymorphs, provide the bulk of the carbonation potential. However, the detection of minor amounts of highly reactive brucite in tailings from Victor, as well as the likely presence of brucite at Venetia, Gahcho Kué, and Snap Lake, is also important for the mineral carbonation potential of the mine sites.

Carbon mineralization, Carbon sequestration, Carbonate, Diamond mining, Kimberlite, Mineral carbonation
0930-0708
1-11
Mervine, Evelyn M.
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Wilson, Siobhan A.
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Power, Ian M.
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Dipple, Gregory M.
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Turvey, Connor C.
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Hamilton, Jessica L.
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Vanderzee, Sterling
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Raudsepp, Mati
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Southam, Colette
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Matter, Juerg M.
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Kelemen, Peter B.
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Stiefenhofer, Johann
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Miya, Zandile
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Southam, Gordon
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Mervine, Evelyn M.
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Wilson, Siobhan A.
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Power, Ian M.
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Dipple, Gregory M.
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Turvey, Connor C.
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Hamilton, Jessica L.
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Vanderzee, Sterling
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Raudsepp, Mati
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Southam, Colette
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Matter, Juerg M.
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Kelemen, Peter B.
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Stiefenhofer, Johann
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Miya, Zandile
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Southam, Gordon
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Mervine, Evelyn M., Wilson, Siobhan A., Power, Ian M., Dipple, Gregory M., Turvey, Connor C., Hamilton, Jessica L., Vanderzee, Sterling, Raudsepp, Mati, Southam, Colette, Matter, Juerg M., Kelemen, Peter B., Stiefenhofer, Johann, Miya, Zandile and Southam, Gordon (2018) Potential for offsetting diamond mine carbon emissions through mineral carbonation of processed kimberlite: an assessment of De Beers mine sites in South Africa and Canada. Mineralogy and Petrology, 1-11. (doi:10.1007/s00710-018-0589-4).

Record type: Article

Abstract

De Beers kimberlite mine operations in South Africa (Venetia and Voorspoed) and Canada (Gahcho Kué, Victor, and Snap Lake) have the potential to sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) through weathering of kimberlite mine tailings, which can store carbon in secondary carbonate minerals (mineral carbonation). Carbonation of ca. 4.7 to 24.0 wt% (average = 13.8 wt%) of annual processed kimberlite production could offset 100% of each mine site’s carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) emissions. Minerals of particular interest for reactivity with atmospheric or waste CO2 from energy production include serpentine minerals, olivine (forsterite), brucite, and smectite. The most abundant minerals, such as serpentine polymorphs, provide the bulk of the carbonation potential. However, the detection of minor amounts of highly reactive brucite in tailings from Victor, as well as the likely presence of brucite at Venetia, Gahcho Kué, and Snap Lake, is also important for the mineral carbonation potential of the mine sites.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 8 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 May 2018
Keywords: Carbon mineralization, Carbon sequestration, Carbonate, Diamond mining, Kimberlite, Mineral carbonation

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424864
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424864
ISSN: 0930-0708
PURE UUID: bd7da271-ebb2-4cf8-9d89-bd2999976736
ORCID for Juerg M. Matter: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1070-7371

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:51
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 03:00

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Contributors

Author: Evelyn M. Mervine
Author: Siobhan A. Wilson
Author: Ian M. Power
Author: Gregory M. Dipple
Author: Connor C. Turvey
Author: Jessica L. Hamilton
Author: Sterling Vanderzee
Author: Mati Raudsepp
Author: Colette Southam
Author: Juerg M. Matter ORCID iD
Author: Peter B. Kelemen
Author: Johann Stiefenhofer
Author: Zandile Miya
Author: Gordon Southam

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