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Strain distribution on a finger link: a static simulation study

Strain distribution on a finger link: a static simulation study
Strain distribution on a finger link: a static simulation study
Functional prosthetics hands which have the ability to help amputees perform tasks in daily life have been developed over many years. These hands need a control system which is fed information from sensors mounted on a prosthetic hand and human–machine interface. A variety of sensors therefore been developed for the prosthetic hand to measure fingertip force, joint angle (position), object slip, texture and temperature. However, most of the strain/stress sensors are attached to the fingertip. In this paper, the potential positions for strain sensors on the side of the finger link of the prosthetic hand are investigated that, in the future, will allow for force control in a lateral or key grip. With modified links of a Southampton Hand, some promising positions for strain sensors have been determined. On some of the links, the strain sensor can be used as an indicator to show the angle of the finger during a curling operation.
prosthetic hand, strain sensor, simulation, Southampton hand
0309-1902
1-12
Liu, Jiawen
22e6df88-4983-40d5-9a9e-fe3e599f3dd5
Chappell, Paul
2d2ec52b-e5d0-4c36-ac20-0a86589a880e
White, Neil
c7be4c26-e419-4e5c-9420-09fc02e2ac9c
Liu, Jiawen
22e6df88-4983-40d5-9a9e-fe3e599f3dd5
Chappell, Paul
2d2ec52b-e5d0-4c36-ac20-0a86589a880e
White, Neil
c7be4c26-e419-4e5c-9420-09fc02e2ac9c

Liu, Jiawen, Chappell, Paul and White, Neil (2018) Strain distribution on a finger link: a static simulation study. Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, 1-12. (doi:10.1080/03091902.2018.1492040).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Functional prosthetics hands which have the ability to help amputees perform tasks in daily life have been developed over many years. These hands need a control system which is fed information from sensors mounted on a prosthetic hand and human–machine interface. A variety of sensors therefore been developed for the prosthetic hand to measure fingertip force, joint angle (position), object slip, texture and temperature. However, most of the strain/stress sensors are attached to the fingertip. In this paper, the potential positions for strain sensors on the side of the finger link of the prosthetic hand are investigated that, in the future, will allow for force control in a lateral or key grip. With modified links of a Southampton Hand, some promising positions for strain sensors have been determined. On some of the links, the strain sensor can be used as an indicator to show the angle of the finger during a curling operation.

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paper20180601 - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 20 August 2019.
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More information

In preparation date: 1 June 2018
Accepted/In Press date: 18 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 August 2018
Keywords: prosthetic hand, strain sensor, simulation, Southampton hand

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424870
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424870
ISSN: 0309-1902
PURE UUID: 433a67da-febd-4656-bfb3-4628f38840de
ORCID for Neil White: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1532-6452

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:51
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:54

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Contributors

Author: Jiawen Liu
Author: Paul Chappell
Author: Neil White ORCID iD

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