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Getting ready for battle: Do cabbage seeds treated with jasmonic acid and chitosan affect chewing and sap-feeding insects?

Getting ready for battle: Do cabbage seeds treated with jasmonic acid and chitosan affect chewing and sap-feeding insects?
Getting ready for battle: Do cabbage seeds treated with jasmonic acid and chitosan affect chewing and sap-feeding insects?

Induced defence allows plants to manage energy reserves more efficiently by synthesizing defence compounds only when needed. A risk of induced defence is that when plants are challenged by herbivores, they may suffer considerable damage before the defence is mounted. Priming can cause a state of readiness for the induction of the defence response, leading to a reduction in the damage received in an energy-efficient and less costly manner. Our objective was to verify whether seed coating with jasmonic acid (JA) and chitosan (CH) could prime plants against chewing and sap-feeding herbivores by affecting their herbivory of treated plants. We used Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata cv. Derby Day (Brassicaceae) seeds treated with JA and CH, second-instar Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), and newborn nymphs of Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). We evaluated life-history, performance, and fecundity traits of the insects. Neither JA nor CH affected B. oleracea leaf area. Both JA and CH affected P. xylostella. JA reduced the mean relative growth rate of P. xylostella and led to 84% pre-imaginal mortality, whereas CH reduced oviposition. JA reduced significantly the intrinsic rate of increase in M. persicae, whereas CH did not differ from the control. Therefore, JA and CH seed coating lead to long-term defence priming in B. oleracea against chewing and sap-feeding insects.

Aphididae, Brassica oleracea, Diamondback moth, Elicitors, Green peach aphid, Herbivores, Induced defence, Myzus persicae, Plutella xylostella, Plutellidae, Priming, Seed coating
0013-8703
412-419
Haas, Jucelaine
87133772-219d-408a-8d14-99779bd165fb
Lozano, Everton Ricardi
d84c0fdd-ed5a-4b86-93d5-12cb39a8b59b
Haida, Kimiyo Shimomura
d6785b28-04b1-47aa-89fb-fd26261ad158
Mazaro, Sérgio Miguel
f2fe4764-c05f-483f-8aea-211c558bc556
de Souza Vismara, Edgar
c0cd143f-8acd-4b13-a142-73087817469c
Poppy, Guy M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389
Haas, Jucelaine
87133772-219d-408a-8d14-99779bd165fb
Lozano, Everton Ricardi
d84c0fdd-ed5a-4b86-93d5-12cb39a8b59b
Haida, Kimiyo Shimomura
d6785b28-04b1-47aa-89fb-fd26261ad158
Mazaro, Sérgio Miguel
f2fe4764-c05f-483f-8aea-211c558bc556
de Souza Vismara, Edgar
c0cd143f-8acd-4b13-a142-73087817469c
Poppy, Guy M.
e18524cf-10ae-4ab4-b50c-e73e7d841389

Haas, Jucelaine, Lozano, Everton Ricardi, Haida, Kimiyo Shimomura, Mazaro, Sérgio Miguel, de Souza Vismara, Edgar and Poppy, Guy M. (2018) Getting ready for battle: Do cabbage seeds treated with jasmonic acid and chitosan affect chewing and sap-feeding insects? Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 166 (5), 412-419. (doi:10.1111/eea.12678).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Induced defence allows plants to manage energy reserves more efficiently by synthesizing defence compounds only when needed. A risk of induced defence is that when plants are challenged by herbivores, they may suffer considerable damage before the defence is mounted. Priming can cause a state of readiness for the induction of the defence response, leading to a reduction in the damage received in an energy-efficient and less costly manner. Our objective was to verify whether seed coating with jasmonic acid (JA) and chitosan (CH) could prime plants against chewing and sap-feeding herbivores by affecting their herbivory of treated plants. We used Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata cv. Derby Day (Brassicaceae) seeds treated with JA and CH, second-instar Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), and newborn nymphs of Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). We evaluated life-history, performance, and fecundity traits of the insects. Neither JA nor CH affected B. oleracea leaf area. Both JA and CH affected P. xylostella. JA reduced the mean relative growth rate of P. xylostella and led to 84% pre-imaginal mortality, whereas CH reduced oviposition. JA reduced significantly the intrinsic rate of increase in M. persicae, whereas CH did not differ from the control. Therefore, JA and CH seed coating lead to long-term defence priming in B. oleracea against chewing and sap-feeding insects.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 6 February 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 10 May 2018
Published date: May 2018
Keywords: Aphididae, Brassica oleracea, Diamondback moth, Elicitors, Green peach aphid, Herbivores, Induced defence, Myzus persicae, Plutella xylostella, Plutellidae, Priming, Seed coating

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 424875
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/424875
ISSN: 0013-8703
PURE UUID: 89f8151f-67f3-4e3f-85fd-67c648d499a4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Oct 2018 11:51
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 17:01

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Contributors

Author: Jucelaine Haas
Author: Everton Ricardi Lozano
Author: Kimiyo Shimomura Haida
Author: Sérgio Miguel Mazaro
Author: Edgar de Souza Vismara
Author: Guy M. Poppy

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