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On-chip nonlinear optics in silicon rich nitride photonic crystal cavities

On-chip nonlinear optics in silicon rich nitride photonic crystal cavities
On-chip nonlinear optics in silicon rich nitride photonic crystal cavities

Photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities allow to confine light with ultra high quality (Q) factors to wavelength-sized mode volumes, with a strong enhancement of light-matter interaction. Although these features make PhC cavities a promising platform for integrated nonlinear optical components, the usual materials of photonic fabrication (specifically silicon and gallium arsenide) suffer from parasitic effects such as two-photon absorption (TPA) and free-carrier absorption (FCA), which limit the benefits of integration. In this work we show how a novel material, silicon rich nitride [1], can be successfully employed for the fabrication of air membraned PhC cavities reaching ultra high Q factor at telecom wavelength. We fabricated samples with line-width modulated geometry, approaching a theoretical value (from FDTD simulations) of Qth = 520, 000. We then measured the cavities with resonant scattering technique [2], determining a maximum experimental value Qexp = 122, 000. We later studied the spectral behaviour of the cavity at a regime of optical bistability [3]. The resulting analysis of the thermo-optic resonance shift as a function of input power suggests the absence of TPA and TPA-related FCA. In order to confirm the suitability of this material for nonlinear optical signal processing, we designed and fabricated far-field optimized samples [4] with heterostructure geometry. Far-field optimization allows to dramatically increase the coupling of the cavity to focused laser beams, thus increasing the available intracavity optical power. In this experimental configuration we observed second (SHG) and third (THG) harmonic generation even at low CW input power (as low as a fraction of milliwatt). These results confirm the suitability of silicon rich nitride as a potential platform for efficient integrated nonlinear optical devices based upon PhC nanocavities in a fully CMOS compatible approach.

Integrated nonlinear optics, Photonic crystal cavities, Silicon rich nitride
1874-6500
401-402
Springer
Clementi, Marco
54aa1831-c800-48c9-b574-5db815765a85
Kapil, D.
aa01749d-524b-4464-b90a-af072e92a02f
Gardes, F.
7a49fc6d-dade-4099-b016-c60737cb5bb2
Galli, M.
5bfc8a21-05e5-4f29-a573-4fa4d7938f7f
Di Bartolo, B.
Silvestri, L.
Cesaria, M.
Collins, J.
Clementi, Marco
54aa1831-c800-48c9-b574-5db815765a85
Kapil, D.
aa01749d-524b-4464-b90a-af072e92a02f
Gardes, F.
7a49fc6d-dade-4099-b016-c60737cb5bb2
Galli, M.
5bfc8a21-05e5-4f29-a573-4fa4d7938f7f
Di Bartolo, B.
Silvestri, L.
Cesaria, M.
Collins, J.

Clementi, Marco, Kapil, D., Gardes, F. and Galli, M. (2018) On-chip nonlinear optics in silicon rich nitride photonic crystal cavities. In, Di Bartolo, B., Silvestri, L., Cesaria, M. and Collins, J. (eds.) Quantum Nano-Photonics: NATO 2017. (NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics, , (doi:10.1007/978-94-024-1544-5_32), Part F3) Dordrecht. Springer, pp. 401-402. (doi:10.1007/978-94-024-1544-5_32).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavities allow to confine light with ultra high quality (Q) factors to wavelength-sized mode volumes, with a strong enhancement of light-matter interaction. Although these features make PhC cavities a promising platform for integrated nonlinear optical components, the usual materials of photonic fabrication (specifically silicon and gallium arsenide) suffer from parasitic effects such as two-photon absorption (TPA) and free-carrier absorption (FCA), which limit the benefits of integration. In this work we show how a novel material, silicon rich nitride [1], can be successfully employed for the fabrication of air membraned PhC cavities reaching ultra high Q factor at telecom wavelength. We fabricated samples with line-width modulated geometry, approaching a theoretical value (from FDTD simulations) of Qth = 520, 000. We then measured the cavities with resonant scattering technique [2], determining a maximum experimental value Qexp = 122, 000. We later studied the spectral behaviour of the cavity at a regime of optical bistability [3]. The resulting analysis of the thermo-optic resonance shift as a function of input power suggests the absence of TPA and TPA-related FCA. In order to confirm the suitability of this material for nonlinear optical signal processing, we designed and fabricated far-field optimized samples [4] with heterostructure geometry. Far-field optimization allows to dramatically increase the coupling of the cavity to focused laser beams, thus increasing the available intracavity optical power. In this experimental configuration we observed second (SHG) and third (THG) harmonic generation even at low CW input power (as low as a fraction of milliwatt). These results confirm the suitability of silicon rich nitride as a potential platform for efficient integrated nonlinear optical devices based upon PhC nanocavities in a fully CMOS compatible approach.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 20 September 2018
Keywords: Integrated nonlinear optics, Photonic crystal cavities, Silicon rich nitride

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425067
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425067
ISSN: 1874-6500
PURE UUID: fe531636-6abc-479a-9483-bbe18066538a

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Date deposited: 10 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 11 Oct 2018 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Marco Clementi
Author: D. Kapil
Author: F. Gardes
Author: M. Galli
Editor: B. Di Bartolo
Editor: L. Silvestri
Editor: M. Cesaria
Editor: J. Collins

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