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A qualitative study exploring views and experiences of people with stroke undergoing transcranial direct current stimulation and upper limb robot therapy

A qualitative study exploring views and experiences of people with stroke undergoing transcranial direct current stimulation and upper limb robot therapy
A qualitative study exploring views and experiences of people with stroke undergoing transcranial direct current stimulation and upper limb robot therapy

Background

Neurorehabilitation technologies used mainly in research such as robot therapy (RT) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can promote upper limb motor recovery after stroke. Understanding the feasibility and efficacy of stroke rehabilitation technologies for upper limb impairments is crucial for effective implementation in practice. Small studies have explored views of RT by people with stroke; however experiences of people receiving tDCS in combination with RT have never been explored.

Objective

To explore views and experiences of people with sub-acute and chronic stroke that had previously taken part in a randomised controlled trial involving tDCS and RT for their impaired upper limb.

Methods

An interview study includes open and closed questions. Face-to-face interviews were audio recorded. Open-ended question responses were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis; closed questions were analyzed using descriptive analysis.

Results

Participants felt that RT was enjoyable (90%) and beneficial for their affected arm (100%). From the open question data, it was found that the intervention was effective for the impaired arm especially in the sub-acute stage. Main reported concerns were that tDCS caused painful, itching and burning sensations and RT was sometimes tiring and difficult. Participants recommended that future research should focus on designing a more comfortable method of tDCS and develop a robot that promotes hand movements.

Conclusions

This study provides new knowledge about the benefits and barriers associated with these technologies which are crucial to the future effective implementation of these tools in practice.

cerebrovascular accident, mixed methods analysis, Non-invasive brain stimulation, perceptions, rehabilitation technology, robot
1074-9357
Tedesco Triccas, L.
cd5de381-2afd-43a0-a9b1-53ec044a3739
Burridge, J.H.
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Hughes, A.M.
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Meadmore, K.L.
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Donovan-Hall, M.
5f138055-2162-4982-846c-5c92411055e0
Rothwell, J.C.
fd939bef-ef9b-44c9-8553-03b7e8a6b399
Verheyden, G.
aabb1bd5-f394-4c82-ba97-7926a4255282
Tedesco Triccas, L.
cd5de381-2afd-43a0-a9b1-53ec044a3739
Burridge, J.H.
0110e9ea-0884-4982-a003-cb6307f38f64
Hughes, A.M.
11239f51-de47-4445-9a0d-5b82ddc11dea
Meadmore, K.L.
4b63707b-4c44-486c-958e-e84645e7ed33
Donovan-Hall, M.
5f138055-2162-4982-846c-5c92411055e0
Rothwell, J.C.
fd939bef-ef9b-44c9-8553-03b7e8a6b399
Verheyden, G.
aabb1bd5-f394-4c82-ba97-7926a4255282

Tedesco Triccas, L., Burridge, J.H., Hughes, A.M., Meadmore, K.L., Donovan-Hall, M., Rothwell, J.C. and Verheyden, G. (2018) A qualitative study exploring views and experiences of people with stroke undergoing transcranial direct current stimulation and upper limb robot therapy. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation. (doi:10.1080/10749357.2018.1493072).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background

Neurorehabilitation technologies used mainly in research such as robot therapy (RT) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can promote upper limb motor recovery after stroke. Understanding the feasibility and efficacy of stroke rehabilitation technologies for upper limb impairments is crucial for effective implementation in practice. Small studies have explored views of RT by people with stroke; however experiences of people receiving tDCS in combination with RT have never been explored.

Objective

To explore views and experiences of people with sub-acute and chronic stroke that had previously taken part in a randomised controlled trial involving tDCS and RT for their impaired upper limb.

Methods

An interview study includes open and closed questions. Face-to-face interviews were audio recorded. Open-ended question responses were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis; closed questions were analyzed using descriptive analysis.

Results

Participants felt that RT was enjoyable (90%) and beneficial for their affected arm (100%). From the open question data, it was found that the intervention was effective for the impaired arm especially in the sub-acute stage. Main reported concerns were that tDCS caused painful, itching and burning sensations and RT was sometimes tiring and difficult. Participants recommended that future research should focus on designing a more comfortable method of tDCS and develop a robot that promotes hand movements.

Conclusions

This study provides new knowledge about the benefits and barriers associated with these technologies which are crucial to the future effective implementation of these tools in practice.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 19 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 20 September 2018
Keywords: cerebrovascular accident, mixed methods analysis, Non-invasive brain stimulation, perceptions, rehabilitation technology, robot

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425107
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425107
ISSN: 1074-9357
PURE UUID: 816f15f0-8169-4dcc-a1df-1ea898de3e5f
ORCID for J.H. Burridge: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-3497-6725
ORCID for A.M. Hughes: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-3958-8206
ORCID for K.L. Meadmore: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5378-8370

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 12 Nov 2019 01:57

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