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Developing a framework for studying brain networks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

Developing a framework for studying brain networks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy
Developing a framework for studying brain networks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

Newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) are at high risk of brain injury, with subsequent developmental problems including severe neuromotor, cognitive and behavioral impairment. Neural correlates of cognitive and behavioral impairment in neonatal HIE, in particular in infants who survive without severe neuromotor impairment, are poorly understood. It is reasonable to hypothesize that in HIE both structural and functional brain networks are altered, and that this might be the neural correlate of impaired cognitive and/or behavioral impairment in HIE. Here, an analysis pipeline to study the structural and functional brain networks from neonatal MRI in newborns with HIE is presented. The structural connectivity is generated from dense whole-brain tractograms derived from diffusion-weighted MR fibre tractography. This investigation of functional connectivity focuses on the emerging resting state networks (RSNs), which are sensitive to injuries from hypoxic-ischemic insults to the newborn brain. In conjunction with the structural connectivity, alterations to the structuro-functional connectivity of the RSNs can be studied. Preliminary results from a proof-of-concept study in a small cohort of newborns with HIE are promising. The obstacles encountered and improvements to the pipeline are discussed. The framework can be further extended for joint analysis with EEG functional-connectivity.

Connectivity, Diffusion MRI, Human brain, Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, Networks, Resting-state functional MRI
1865-0929
203-216
Springer Verlag
Lennartsson, Finn
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Darekar, Angela
62e6b511-a358-4e5d-a4ea-03890ba7c2c7
Maharatna, Koushik
93bef0a2-e011-4622-8c56-5447da4cd5dd
Konn, Daniel
16577bdb-7225-48b1-96c6-1700276498da
Allen, David
38083719-a676-4503-b194-a055ee12e71b
Tournier, J. Donald
88d38d6d-fbd5-4e9a-b9ff-9c9a7ff13fa0
Broulidakis, John
3c9f7ce0-88fc-4ed8-b0e1-1f4b3237ab13
Vollmer, Brigitte
044f8b55-ba36-4fb2-8e7e-756ab77653ba
Nixon, M.
Mahmoodi, S.
Zwiggerlaar, R.
Lennartsson, Finn
e9fb1096-1bc5-45ae-8972-560aa86f45ba
Darekar, Angela
62e6b511-a358-4e5d-a4ea-03890ba7c2c7
Maharatna, Koushik
93bef0a2-e011-4622-8c56-5447da4cd5dd
Konn, Daniel
16577bdb-7225-48b1-96c6-1700276498da
Allen, David
38083719-a676-4503-b194-a055ee12e71b
Tournier, J. Donald
88d38d6d-fbd5-4e9a-b9ff-9c9a7ff13fa0
Broulidakis, John
3c9f7ce0-88fc-4ed8-b0e1-1f4b3237ab13
Vollmer, Brigitte
044f8b55-ba36-4fb2-8e7e-756ab77653ba
Nixon, M.
Mahmoodi, S.
Zwiggerlaar, R.

Lennartsson, Finn, Darekar, Angela, Maharatna, Koushik, Konn, Daniel, Allen, David, Tournier, J. Donald, Broulidakis, John and Vollmer, Brigitte (2018) Developing a framework for studying brain networks in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. Nixon, M., Mahmoodi, S. and Zwiggerlaar, R. (eds.) In Medical Image Understanding and Analysis - 22nd Conference, Proceedings. vol. 894, Springer Verlag. pp. 203-216 . (doi:10.1007/978-3-319-95921-4_20).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) are at high risk of brain injury, with subsequent developmental problems including severe neuromotor, cognitive and behavioral impairment. Neural correlates of cognitive and behavioral impairment in neonatal HIE, in particular in infants who survive without severe neuromotor impairment, are poorly understood. It is reasonable to hypothesize that in HIE both structural and functional brain networks are altered, and that this might be the neural correlate of impaired cognitive and/or behavioral impairment in HIE. Here, an analysis pipeline to study the structural and functional brain networks from neonatal MRI in newborns with HIE is presented. The structural connectivity is generated from dense whole-brain tractograms derived from diffusion-weighted MR fibre tractography. This investigation of functional connectivity focuses on the emerging resting state networks (RSNs), which are sensitive to injuries from hypoxic-ischemic insults to the newborn brain. In conjunction with the structural connectivity, alterations to the structuro-functional connectivity of the RSNs can be studied. Preliminary results from a proof-of-concept study in a small cohort of newborns with HIE are promising. The obstacles encountered and improvements to the pipeline are discussed. The framework can be further extended for joint analysis with EEG functional-connectivity.

Text
MIUA_2018_Final_Full_paper_-_Finn_Lennartsson - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 21 August 2018
Venue - Dates: 22nd Conference on Medical Image Understanding and Analysis, MIUA 2018, Southampton, United Kingdom, 2018-07-09 - 2018-07-11
Keywords: Connectivity, Diffusion MRI, Human brain, Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, Networks, Resting-state functional MRI

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425108
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425108
ISSN: 1865-0929
PURE UUID: f6e00dcd-5ef6-4e5b-979b-73e0f7fd5ece
ORCID for Brigitte Vollmer: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4088-5336

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 22 Aug 2019 04:01

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