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Using agent-based simulation to analyse the effect of broadcast and narrowcast on public perception: a case in social risk amplification

Using agent-based simulation to analyse the effect of broadcast and narrowcast on public perception: a case in social risk amplification
Using agent-based simulation to analyse the effect of broadcast and narrowcast on public perception: a case in social risk amplification
Individuals often use information from broadcast news (e.g. media) and narrowcast news (e.g. personal social network) to form their perception on a certain social issue. Using a case study in social risk amplification, this paper demonstrates that simulation modelling, specifically agent-based simulation, can be useful in analysing the effect of broadcast and narrowcast processes on the formation of public risk perception. The first part of this paper explains the structure of a model that allows easy configuration for testing various behaviours about which the empirical literature cannot make definitive predictions. The second part of this paper discusses the effect of personal social network and the role of media in the dynamics of public risk perception. The results show the undesirable effect of the extreme narrowcast process in society and a media that simply broadcasts the average public risk perception.
Agent-based simulation, risk perception, Social network, social amplification of risk framework
322-333
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Onggo, Stephan
8e9a2ea5-140a-44c0-9c17-e9cf93662f80
Busby, Jeremy
58ad9a6a-0450-4cc3-a68b-12cc74796cce
Liu, Yun
103d136a-822d-468a-854d-5198f461a0f1
Onggo, Stephan
8e9a2ea5-140a-44c0-9c17-e9cf93662f80
Busby, Jeremy
58ad9a6a-0450-4cc3-a68b-12cc74796cce
Liu, Yun
103d136a-822d-468a-854d-5198f461a0f1

Onggo, Stephan, Busby, Jeremy and Liu, Yun (2014) Using agent-based simulation to analyse the effect of broadcast and narrowcast on public perception: a case in social risk amplification. In Proceedings of the Winter Simulation Conference 2014. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. pp. 322-333 . (doi:10.1109/WSC.2014.7019899).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

Individuals often use information from broadcast news (e.g. media) and narrowcast news (e.g. personal social network) to form their perception on a certain social issue. Using a case study in social risk amplification, this paper demonstrates that simulation modelling, specifically agent-based simulation, can be useful in analysing the effect of broadcast and narrowcast processes on the formation of public risk perception. The first part of this paper explains the structure of a model that allows easy configuration for testing various behaviours about which the empirical literature cannot make definitive predictions. The second part of this paper discusses the effect of personal social network and the role of media in the dynamics of public risk perception. The results show the undesirable effect of the extreme narrowcast process in society and a media that simply broadcasts the average public risk perception.

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More information

Published date: December 2014
Keywords: Agent-based simulation, risk perception, Social network, social amplification of risk framework

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425176
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425176
PURE UUID: 7bce6fa7-6ec0-46d9-841d-88d15075086b
ORCID for Stephan Onggo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5899-304X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 29 Oct 2019 01:22

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