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Energy harvesting for smart city applications

Energy harvesting for smart city applications
Energy harvesting for smart city applications

The 'smart cities' concept is now becoming a reality: cities are increasingly connected and intelligent, with rapid advances in diverse areas including transportation, utilities, and municipal services. These can allow services to be delivered more efficiently and reliably, enriching residents' and visitors' experiences, and the data generated can be used for innovative new applications. While many sensors enabling these applications can be grid-powered, there is an increasing need for autonomous distributed or wearable sensing devices, which may also perform edge analytics. While these systems are typically powered by batteries so that they can be deployed quickly and cheaply, this comes with the cost of periodic battery replacement. This paper surveys the state-of-the-art in smart city sensing applications and considers their future directions, focusing on the power demands of sensors, and considerations for using energy harvesting.

111-117
IEEE
Weddell, Alex S.
3d8c4d63-19b1-4072-a779-84d487fd6f03
Magno, Michele
e9353eec-6f2a-4f3a-b972-8a594ad52a0b
Weddell, Alex S.
3d8c4d63-19b1-4072-a779-84d487fd6f03
Magno, Michele
e9353eec-6f2a-4f3a-b972-8a594ad52a0b

Weddell, Alex S. and Magno, Michele (2018) Energy harvesting for smart city applications. In 2018 International Symposium on Power Electronics, Electrical Drives, Automation and Motion (SPEEDAM). IEEE. pp. 111-117 . (doi:10.1109/SPEEDAM.2018.8445323).

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The 'smart cities' concept is now becoming a reality: cities are increasingly connected and intelligent, with rapid advances in diverse areas including transportation, utilities, and municipal services. These can allow services to be delivered more efficiently and reliably, enriching residents' and visitors' experiences, and the data generated can be used for innovative new applications. While many sensors enabling these applications can be grid-powered, there is an increasing need for autonomous distributed or wearable sensing devices, which may also perform edge analytics. While these systems are typically powered by batteries so that they can be deployed quickly and cheaply, this comes with the cost of periodic battery replacement. This paper surveys the state-of-the-art in smart city sensing applications and considers their future directions, focusing on the power demands of sensors, and considerations for using energy harvesting.

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More information

Published date: 23 August 2018
Venue - Dates: 2018 International Symposium on Power Electronics, Electrical Drives, Automation and Motion, SPEEDAM 2018, , Amalfi, Italy, 2018-06-20 - 2018-06-22

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425188
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425188
PURE UUID: bafea300-4112-40bd-9c18-fea25c9098e2
ORCID for Alex S. Weddell: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6763-5460

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 23 Jul 2022 01:55

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Contributors

Author: Alex S. Weddell ORCID iD
Author: Michele Magno

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