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The role of social networks in Small Island Communities: lessons from the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season

The role of social networks in Small Island Communities: lessons from the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season
The role of social networks in Small Island Communities: lessons from the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season
The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was abnormally destructive. For small island developing states (SIDS) a range of underlying issues such as climate change and infrastructure failures also heightened risk. With the increased use of social media and other digital technologies, communities within SIDS are relying on new methods of information dissemination during crises. This paper analyses the ways in which social media and other digital technologies are used in the Caribbean for hurricane resilience and preparedness, using the case study of Antigua and Barbuda that were particularly damaged during the 2017 season. The study scopes the place of such technologies at present through the use of qualitative interviews from a range of governmental departments, organisations, humanitarian aid charities, ex-politicians, business owners and members of the public. It concludes by deriving three main lessons for SIDS for the better management of future hurricane seasons.
Social Media, Disaster Management, Hurricane, Small Island Developing States, Social Networks
Gray, Briony, Jennifer
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Gray, Briony, Jennifer
b2dfca6f-f16b-45ba-bd84-9a6ca17faa1f

Gray, Briony, Jennifer (2019) The role of social networks in Small Island Communities: lessons from the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season. Proceedings of the 52nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2019, Maui, United States. 08 - 11 Jan 2019.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)

Abstract

The 2017 Atlantic hurricane season was abnormally destructive. For small island developing states (SIDS) a range of underlying issues such as climate change and infrastructure failures also heightened risk. With the increased use of social media and other digital technologies, communities within SIDS are relying on new methods of information dissemination during crises. This paper analyses the ways in which social media and other digital technologies are used in the Caribbean for hurricane resilience and preparedness, using the case study of Antigua and Barbuda that were particularly damaged during the 2017 season. The study scopes the place of such technologies at present through the use of qualitative interviews from a range of governmental departments, organisations, humanitarian aid charities, ex-politicians, business owners and members of the public. It concludes by deriving three main lessons for SIDS for the better management of future hurricane seasons.

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Submitted date: 2018
Published date: 8 January 2019
Venue - Dates: Proceedings of the 52nd Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2019, Maui, United States, 2019-01-08 - 2019-01-11
Keywords: Social Media, Disaster Management, Hurricane, Small Island Developing States, Social Networks

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Local EPrints ID: 425189
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425189
PURE UUID: a2484e7e-f397-4b86-bf33-22a0bd28f19a

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:57

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