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How self-determined choice facilitates performance: A key role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex

How self-determined choice facilitates performance: A key role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex
How self-determined choice facilitates performance: A key role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex
Recent studies have documented that self-determined choice does indeed enhance performance. However, the precise neural mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. We examined the neural correlates of the facilitative effects of self-determined choice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants played a game-like task involving a stopwatch with either a stopwatch they selected (self-determined-choice condition) or one they were assigned without choice (forced-choice condition). Our results showed that self-determined choice enhanced performance on the stopwatch task, despite the fact that the choices were clearly irrelevant to task difficulty. Neuroimaging results showed that failure feedback, compared with success feedback, elicited a drop in the vmPFC activation in the forced-choice condition, but not in the self-determined-choice condition, indicating that negative reward value associated with the failure feedback vanished in the self-determined-choice condition. Moreover, the vmPFC resilience to failure in the self-determined-choice condition was significantly correlated with the increased performance. Striatal responses to failure and success feedback were not modulated by the choice condition, indicating the dissociation between the vmPFC and striatal activation pattern. These findings suggest that the vmPFC plays a unique and critical role in the facilitative effects of self-determined choice on performance.
1047-3211
1241-1251
Murayama, Kou
3e47d8f9-5a0d-416b-b03a-cc1acd058266
Matsumoto, Madoka
fce773d5-53c8-49eb-b481-e1e5db38d436
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a
Sugiura, Ayaka
0ddf0be3-803f-4ab9-b013-5b49309d6d11
Ryan, Richard M.
f56d77de-8c11-4ca4-afcf-3224f11d0243
Deci, Edward L.
e3651b04-58eb-4b52-8dcd-f62169e87726
Matsumoto, Kenji
df068ed2-7c79-4c79-9e8d-ac73bfcfbeeb
Murayama, Kou
3e47d8f9-5a0d-416b-b03a-cc1acd058266
Matsumoto, Madoka
fce773d5-53c8-49eb-b481-e1e5db38d436
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a
Sugiura, Ayaka
0ddf0be3-803f-4ab9-b013-5b49309d6d11
Ryan, Richard M.
f56d77de-8c11-4ca4-afcf-3224f11d0243
Deci, Edward L.
e3651b04-58eb-4b52-8dcd-f62169e87726
Matsumoto, Kenji
df068ed2-7c79-4c79-9e8d-ac73bfcfbeeb

Murayama, Kou, Matsumoto, Madoka, Izuma, Keise, Sugiura, Ayaka, Ryan, Richard M., Deci, Edward L. and Matsumoto, Kenji (2015) How self-determined choice facilitates performance: A key role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Cerebral Cortex, 25 (5), 1241-1251. (doi:10.1093/cercor/bht317).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Recent studies have documented that self-determined choice does indeed enhance performance. However, the precise neural mechanisms underlying this effect are not well understood. We examined the neural correlates of the facilitative effects of self-determined choice using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants played a game-like task involving a stopwatch with either a stopwatch they selected (self-determined-choice condition) or one they were assigned without choice (forced-choice condition). Our results showed that self-determined choice enhanced performance on the stopwatch task, despite the fact that the choices were clearly irrelevant to task difficulty. Neuroimaging results showed that failure feedback, compared with success feedback, elicited a drop in the vmPFC activation in the forced-choice condition, but not in the self-determined-choice condition, indicating that negative reward value associated with the failure feedback vanished in the self-determined-choice condition. Moreover, the vmPFC resilience to failure in the self-determined-choice condition was significantly correlated with the increased performance. Striatal responses to failure and success feedback were not modulated by the choice condition, indicating the dissociation between the vmPFC and striatal activation pattern. These findings suggest that the vmPFC plays a unique and critical role in the facilitative effects of self-determined choice on performance.

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e-pub ahead of print date: 2 December 2013
Published date: May 2015
Additional Information: © The Author 2013.This is an author-produced version of the published paper. Uploaded in accordance with the publisher’s self-archiving policy. Further copying may not be permitted; contact the publisher for details

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Local EPrints ID: 425200
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425200
ISSN: 1047-3211
PURE UUID: c4822a11-5681-44d0-a71d-b3e2e5017f28

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 11 Oct 2018 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Kou Murayama
Author: Madoka Matsumoto
Author: Keise Izuma
Author: Ayaka Sugiura
Author: Richard M. Ryan
Author: Edward L. Deci
Author: Kenji Matsumoto

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