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Attitude change and cognitive consistency

Attitude change and cognitive consistency
Attitude change and cognitive consistency
Human attitudes are influenced by a motivation to be consistent. For example, if students write essays supporting a tuition increase before their tuition actually increases, they typically report more positive attitudes toward the change. When attitudes shift in order to be more consistent with behavior, this shift may reflect an underlying desire to reduce an inconsistent state known as ‘cognitive dissonance.’ Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in social psychology, its neural mechanisms remain unknown. Recently, social neuroscience studies have begun to shed light on the neural bases of attitude change following cognitive inconsistency. These studies have implicated several brain regions, including the posterior medial frontal cortex, anterior insula, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.
247-250
Elsevier
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a

Izuma, Keise (2015) Attitude change and cognitive consistency. In, Brain Mapping: An Encyclopedic Reference. Elsevier, pp. 247-250. (doi:10.1016/B978-0-12-397025-1.00188-3).

Record type: Book Section

Abstract

Human attitudes are influenced by a motivation to be consistent. For example, if students write essays supporting a tuition increase before their tuition actually increases, they typically report more positive attitudes toward the change. When attitudes shift in order to be more consistent with behavior, this shift may reflect an underlying desire to reduce an inconsistent state known as ‘cognitive dissonance.’ Although this phenomenon has been studied extensively in social psychology, its neural mechanisms remain unknown. Recently, social neuroscience studies have begun to shed light on the neural bases of attitude change following cognitive inconsistency. These studies have implicated several brain regions, including the posterior medial frontal cortex, anterior insula, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

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Published date: 2015

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Local EPrints ID: 425201
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425201
PURE UUID: 56e6585d-8180-42b0-8bce-c660c0c0492b

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 11 Oct 2018 16:30

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