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The neural basis of social influence and attitude change

The neural basis of social influence and attitude change
The neural basis of social influence and attitude change
Human attitudes and preferences are susceptible to social influence. Recent social neuroscience studies, using theories and experimental paradigms from social psychology, have begun to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying how others influence our attitudes through processes such as social conformity, cognitive inconsistency and persuasion. The currently available evidence highlights the role of the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) in social conformity and cognitive inconsistency, which represents the discrepancy between one's own and another person's opinion, or, more broadly, between currently inconsistent and ideally consistent states. Research on persuasion has revealed that people's susceptibility to persuasive messages is related to activation in a nearby but more anterior part of the medial frontal cortex. Future progress in this field will depend upon the ability of researchers to dissociate underlying motivations for attitude change in different paradigms, and to utilize neuroimaging methods to advance social psychological theories of social influence.
0959-4388
456-462
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a

Izuma, Keise (2013) The neural basis of social influence and attitude change. Current opinion in neurobiology, 23 (3), 456-462. (doi:10.1016/j.conb.2013.03.009).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Human attitudes and preferences are susceptible to social influence. Recent social neuroscience studies, using theories and experimental paradigms from social psychology, have begun to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying how others influence our attitudes through processes such as social conformity, cognitive inconsistency and persuasion. The currently available evidence highlights the role of the posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) in social conformity and cognitive inconsistency, which represents the discrepancy between one's own and another person's opinion, or, more broadly, between currently inconsistent and ideally consistent states. Research on persuasion has revealed that people's susceptibility to persuasive messages is related to activation in a nearby but more anterior part of the medial frontal cortex. Future progress in this field will depend upon the ability of researchers to dissociate underlying motivations for attitude change in different paradigms, and to utilize neuroimaging methods to advance social psychological theories of social influence.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 19 April 2013
Published date: June 2013
Additional Information: Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425205
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425205
ISSN: 0959-4388
PURE UUID: 36e1a0de-2f7a-4501-93f9-71500b49e02a

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 11 Oct 2018 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Keise Izuma

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