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Social manipulation of preference in the human brain

Social manipulation of preference in the human brain
Social manipulation of preference in the human brain
Our preferences are influenced by what other people like, but depend critically on how we feel about those people, a classical psychological effect called "cognitive balance." Here, we manipulated preferences for goods by telling participants the preferences of strongly liked or disliked groups of other people. Participants' preferences converged to those of the liked group, but diverged from the disliked group. Activation of dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) tracked the discrepancy between one's own preference and its social ideal and was associated with subsequent preference change (toward the liked and away from the disliked group), even several months later. A follow-up study found overlapping activation in this same region of dmPFC with negative monetary outcomes, but no overlap with nearby activations induced by response conflict. A single social encounter can thus result in long-lasting preference change, a mechanism that recruits dmPFC and that may reflect the aversive nature of cognitive imbalance.
0896-6273
563-573
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a
Adolphs, Ralph
95a28d79-bdf7-42d6-b18a-503e85afa601
Izuma, Keise
67894464-b2eb-4834-9727-c2a870587e5a
Adolphs, Ralph
95a28d79-bdf7-42d6-b18a-503e85afa601

Izuma, Keise and Adolphs, Ralph (2013) Social manipulation of preference in the human brain. Neuron, 78 (3), 563-573. (doi:10.1016/j.neuron.2013.03.023).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Our preferences are influenced by what other people like, but depend critically on how we feel about those people, a classical psychological effect called "cognitive balance." Here, we manipulated preferences for goods by telling participants the preferences of strongly liked or disliked groups of other people. Participants' preferences converged to those of the liked group, but diverged from the disliked group. Activation of dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) tracked the discrepancy between one's own preference and its social ideal and was associated with subsequent preference change (toward the liked and away from the disliked group), even several months later. A follow-up study found overlapping activation in this same region of dmPFC with negative monetary outcomes, but no overlap with nearby activations induced by response conflict. A single social encounter can thus result in long-lasting preference change, a mechanism that recruits dmPFC and that may reflect the aversive nature of cognitive imbalance.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 March 2013
e-pub ahead of print date: 8 May 2013
Published date: 8 May 2013

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425206
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425206
ISSN: 0896-6273
PURE UUID: a325cbca-cb8a-482b-8ce6-4060febae554

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 11 Oct 2018 16:30

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Contributors

Author: Keise Izuma
Author: Ralph Adolphs

University divisions

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