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Simulation of career development in the European Commission

Simulation of career development in the European Commission
Simulation of career development in the European Commission
The European Commission (the Commission) employs more than 22,000 officials who provide administrative services to the European Union. In 2003, the Commission introduced a performance appraisal and promotion system based on points that the officials earn each year. In 2006, the Commission realized that the system needed to be revised. To support the review process, the Commission invited tenders for a project to develop simulation models that it could use to project the future performance of the existing system. A team from Lancaster University won the bid and subsequently worked closely with Commission officials to develop a new system. In 2009, the stakeholders in the Commission's performance appraisal and promotion system agreed to implement the improved system. The simulation model is unusual in the field of manpower planning because it models the consequences of appraisal-system rules. It uses novel, accurate, and efficient sampling techniques that are based on regression models of the underlying relationships in the data. The model was a crucial part of renegotiating the appraisal and promotion system and implementing a new system.
simulation, application, statistical data analysis, manpower planning, government
0092-2102
184-195
Onggo, Stephan
8e9a2ea5-140a-44c0-9c17-e9cf93662f80
Pidd, Michael
c7ab5ef0-30d6-4d32-821b-45642650f5b0
Soopramanien, Didier
36d38372-2cc0-4934-9bb2-9f791cd6990a
Worthington, Dave
f85be350-c1fd-4ea4-b499-d518a098a681
Onggo, Stephan
8e9a2ea5-140a-44c0-9c17-e9cf93662f80
Pidd, Michael
c7ab5ef0-30d6-4d32-821b-45642650f5b0
Soopramanien, Didier
36d38372-2cc0-4934-9bb2-9f791cd6990a
Worthington, Dave
f85be350-c1fd-4ea4-b499-d518a098a681

Onggo, Stephan, Pidd, Michael, Soopramanien, Didier and Worthington, Dave (2010) Simulation of career development in the European Commission. Interfaces: An International Journal of the Institute for Operations Research & Management Sciences, 40 (3), 184-195. (doi:10.1287/inte.1100.0489).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The European Commission (the Commission) employs more than 22,000 officials who provide administrative services to the European Union. In 2003, the Commission introduced a performance appraisal and promotion system based on points that the officials earn each year. In 2006, the Commission realized that the system needed to be revised. To support the review process, the Commission invited tenders for a project to develop simulation models that it could use to project the future performance of the existing system. A team from Lancaster University won the bid and subsequently worked closely with Commission officials to develop a new system. In 2009, the stakeholders in the Commission's performance appraisal and promotion system agreed to implement the improved system. The simulation model is unusual in the field of manpower planning because it models the consequences of appraisal-system rules. It uses novel, accurate, and efficient sampling techniques that are based on regression models of the underlying relationships in the data. The model was a crucial part of renegotiating the appraisal and promotion system and implementing a new system.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 7 April 2010
Published date: May 2010
Keywords: simulation, application, statistical data analysis, manpower planning, government

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425234
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425234
ISSN: 0092-2102
PURE UUID: 855d18ea-d111-4091-a7ce-e6012254ee58
ORCID for Stephan Onggo: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5899-304X

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Date deposited: 11 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 08 Jan 2022 03:38

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Contributors

Author: Stephan Onggo ORCID iD
Author: Michael Pidd
Author: Didier Soopramanien
Author: Dave Worthington

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