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Exploring impact of frequency and intensity of fatigue in Parkinson's via self-report questionnaires

Exploring impact of frequency and intensity of fatigue in Parkinson's via self-report questionnaires
Exploring impact of frequency and intensity of fatigue in Parkinson's via self-report questionnaires

Introduction/Background: Fatigue is one of the most disabling symptoms reported by a third of people with Parkinson's (PwP), but is difficult to diagnose and manage. The aim of our study was to explore differences between PwP experiencing fatigue at varying frequencies. Material and method: Following Ethics approval, we invited Parkinson's UK members across southern England via email, website promotion and local branch meetings to complete a self-report survey on frequency, intensity and impact of fatigue defined as ‘intense/severe tiredness, or exhaustion’. Results: In all, 100/130 (77%) people returned the questionnaires, 59 males. 67% respondents felt fatigued ‘frequently’ (2–5 times per week/few hours daily/all-day everyday), 23% ‘sometimes’ (2–5 times/month) and 10% ‘rarely’ (0–1 times/month). ‘Frequently-fatigued’ ‘sometimes-fatigued’ and ‘rarely-fatigued’ did not significantly differ in duration since diagnosis (6.8 years vs. 6.4 years vs. 7.25 years) or age (68.1 years vs. 66.2 years vs. 69.4 years). Higher proportion of ‘frequently-fatigued’ participants compared to ‘sometimes-fatigued’ and ‘rarely-fatigued’ were women (45% vs. 35% vs. 30%), working (22% vs. 17% vs. 10%), and reported greater intensity of fatigue on Parkinson's Fatigue Scale (58 vs. 42 vs. 31/80). Sixty-one percent Frequently-fatigued participants satisfied the key diagnostic-criterion of ‘feeling fatigued most of the day nearly every-day/every-day’ for establishing Parkinson's-related fatigue proposed by the Movement Disorder Society. They reported fatigue predominantly in early-afternoon (55%) and evening (49%). 84% frequently-fatigued participants could identify factors that triggered fatigue; 81% felt stress made fatigue worse. 84% frequently-fatigued participants felt tired despite resting. More frequently-fatigued PwP than sometimes-fatigued reported falls (51% vs. 26%); gave up routine activities (48% vs. 4%) and hobbies (49% v 30%); and planned further restrictions to activities (36% vs. 17%) and hobbies (37% vs. 13%) due to fatigue. Conclusion: Activity and leisure abandonment is higher among frequently-fatigued PwP who experience fatigue symptoms at greater intensity than other PwP. We plan to explore impact of fatigue in Parkinson's using wearable sensors.

Fatigue, Parkinson's, Survey
1877-0657
e45
Agarwal, V.
a9136686-fe91-4945-a02f-4d129e387197
Stack, E.
a6c29a03-e851-4598-a565-6a92bb581e70
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991
Agarwal, V.
a9136686-fe91-4945-a02f-4d129e387197
Stack, E.
a6c29a03-e851-4598-a565-6a92bb581e70
Ashburn, A.
818b9ce8-f025-429e-9532-43ee4fd5f991

Agarwal, V., Stack, E. and Ashburn, A. (2018) Exploring impact of frequency and intensity of fatigue in Parkinson's via self-report questionnaires. Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, 61 (Supplement), e45. (doi:10.1016/j.rehab.2018.05.100).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction/Background: Fatigue is one of the most disabling symptoms reported by a third of people with Parkinson's (PwP), but is difficult to diagnose and manage. The aim of our study was to explore differences between PwP experiencing fatigue at varying frequencies. Material and method: Following Ethics approval, we invited Parkinson's UK members across southern England via email, website promotion and local branch meetings to complete a self-report survey on frequency, intensity and impact of fatigue defined as ‘intense/severe tiredness, or exhaustion’. Results: In all, 100/130 (77%) people returned the questionnaires, 59 males. 67% respondents felt fatigued ‘frequently’ (2–5 times per week/few hours daily/all-day everyday), 23% ‘sometimes’ (2–5 times/month) and 10% ‘rarely’ (0–1 times/month). ‘Frequently-fatigued’ ‘sometimes-fatigued’ and ‘rarely-fatigued’ did not significantly differ in duration since diagnosis (6.8 years vs. 6.4 years vs. 7.25 years) or age (68.1 years vs. 66.2 years vs. 69.4 years). Higher proportion of ‘frequently-fatigued’ participants compared to ‘sometimes-fatigued’ and ‘rarely-fatigued’ were women (45% vs. 35% vs. 30%), working (22% vs. 17% vs. 10%), and reported greater intensity of fatigue on Parkinson's Fatigue Scale (58 vs. 42 vs. 31/80). Sixty-one percent Frequently-fatigued participants satisfied the key diagnostic-criterion of ‘feeling fatigued most of the day nearly every-day/every-day’ for establishing Parkinson's-related fatigue proposed by the Movement Disorder Society. They reported fatigue predominantly in early-afternoon (55%) and evening (49%). 84% frequently-fatigued participants could identify factors that triggered fatigue; 81% felt stress made fatigue worse. 84% frequently-fatigued participants felt tired despite resting. More frequently-fatigued PwP than sometimes-fatigued reported falls (51% vs. 26%); gave up routine activities (48% vs. 4%) and hobbies (49% v 30%); and planned further restrictions to activities (36% vs. 17%) and hobbies (37% vs. 13%) due to fatigue. Conclusion: Activity and leisure abandonment is higher among frequently-fatigued PwP who experience fatigue symptoms at greater intensity than other PwP. We plan to explore impact of fatigue in Parkinson's using wearable sensors.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 13 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 July 2018
Published date: July 2018
Keywords: Fatigue, Parkinson's, Survey

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425343
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425343
ISSN: 1877-0657
PURE UUID: 4e56443e-15c1-474d-be32-567297fd611c
ORCID for V. Agarwal: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-6904-8243

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 12 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 10 Jan 2020 17:33

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