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Nursing and allied health professionals’ views about using health literacy screening tools and a universal precautions approach to communication with older adults: a qualitative study

Nursing and allied health professionals’ views about using health literacy screening tools and a universal precautions approach to communication with older adults: a qualitative study
Nursing and allied health professionals’ views about using health literacy screening tools and a universal precautions approach to communication with older adults: a qualitative study
Purpose: Health literacy describes individuals’ abilities to access, understand and use health information. Lower health literacy is associated with poor health outcomes, is more common among older adults and impacts on the effectiveness of rehabilitation/self-management interventions. This research explored nursing and allied healthcare professionals’ views about identifying and responding to older adults’ health literacy needs.

Methods: Qualitative focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of 22 UK nursing and AHPs working with older adults. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework approach.

Results: Participants used a variety of practices to identify older patients’ health literacy levels, but primarily relied on subtle cues. Participants lacked knowledge and confidence in identifying and addressing health literacy needs. Participants expressed concerns about patient reactions and described practical barriers to using recommended health literacy strategies.

Conclusions: Participants recognised the importance of addressing patients’ health literacy needs, but do not routinely use health literacy strategies, lack confidence and have reservations about recommended health literacy strategies. This impacts on healthcare professionals’ abilities to support patients to self-manage and participate in rehabilitation. Health literacy education for health professionals should consider barriers to using health literacy strategies and be tailored to accommodate variation in teams and professions.
0963-8288
Brooks, Charlotte
f1772470-2f7d-4738-96d8-01d0c1b6ea3a
Ballinger, Claire
1495742c-90aa-4074-920e-95e6cc3d5380
Nutbeam, Donald
352dc808-9160-42e7-8b52-b8cac02ad486
Mander, Clare
5e4c13e6-7cde-47a5-b7e4-851566debf46
Adams, Joanna
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Brooks, Charlotte
f1772470-2f7d-4738-96d8-01d0c1b6ea3a
Ballinger, Claire
1495742c-90aa-4074-920e-95e6cc3d5380
Nutbeam, Donald
352dc808-9160-42e7-8b52-b8cac02ad486
Mander, Clare
5e4c13e6-7cde-47a5-b7e4-851566debf46
Adams, Joanna
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba

Brooks, Charlotte, Ballinger, Claire, Nutbeam, Donald, Mander, Clare and Adams, Joanna (2019) Nursing and allied health professionals’ views about using health literacy screening tools and a universal precautions approach to communication with older adults: a qualitative study. Disability and Rehabilitation. (doi:10.1080/09638288.2018.1538392).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose: Health literacy describes individuals’ abilities to access, understand and use health information. Lower health literacy is associated with poor health outcomes, is more common among older adults and impacts on the effectiveness of rehabilitation/self-management interventions. This research explored nursing and allied healthcare professionals’ views about identifying and responding to older adults’ health literacy needs.

Methods: Qualitative focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of 22 UK nursing and AHPs working with older adults. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework approach.

Results: Participants used a variety of practices to identify older patients’ health literacy levels, but primarily relied on subtle cues. Participants lacked knowledge and confidence in identifying and addressing health literacy needs. Participants expressed concerns about patient reactions and described practical barriers to using recommended health literacy strategies.

Conclusions: Participants recognised the importance of addressing patients’ health literacy needs, but do not routinely use health literacy strategies, lack confidence and have reservations about recommended health literacy strategies. This impacts on healthcare professionals’ abilities to support patients to self-manage and participate in rehabilitation. Health literacy education for health professionals should consider barriers to using health literacy strategies and be tailored to accommodate variation in teams and professions.

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Nursing and allied health professionals’ views about using health literacy screening tools and a universal precautions approach to communication with older adults: a qualitative study - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 16 July 2020.
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Nursing and allied health professionals’ views about using health literacy PUBLISHED - Version of Record
Restricted to Repository staff only
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 16 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 22 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425441
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425441
ISSN: 0963-8288
PURE UUID: 8da44673-0055-4d59-b087-cc2ada681216
ORCID for Charlotte Brooks: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4461-1247
ORCID for Joanna Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1765-7060

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 18 May 2019 00:38

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