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Isolation and comparative transcriptome analysis of human fetal and iPSC-derived cone photoreceptor cells

Isolation and comparative transcriptome analysis of human fetal and iPSC-derived cone photoreceptor cells
Isolation and comparative transcriptome analysis of human fetal and iPSC-derived cone photoreceptor cells
Loss of cone photoreceptors, crucial for daylight vision, has the greatest impact on sight in retinal degeneration. Transplantation of stem cell-derived L/M-opsin cones, which form 90% of the human cone population, could provide a feasible therapy to restore vision. However, transcriptomic similarities between fetal and stem cell-derived cones remain to be defined, in addition to development of cone cell purification strategies. Here, we report an analysis of the human L/M-opsin cone photoreceptor transcriptome using an AAV2/9.pR2.1:GFP reporter. This led to the identification of a cone-enriched gene signature, which we used to demonstrate similar gene expression between fetal and stem cell-derived cones. We then defined a cluster of differentiation marker combination that, when used for cell sorting, significantly enriches for cone photoreceptors from the fetal retina and stem cell-derived retinal organoids, respectively. These data may facilitate more efficient isolation of human stem cell-derived cones for use in clinical transplantation studies.
2213-6711
1898-1915
Lakowski, Jorn
1856e739-982a-412a-87c7-abf1610f5384
Lakowski, Jorn
1856e739-982a-412a-87c7-abf1610f5384

Lakowski, Jorn (2017) Isolation and comparative transcriptome analysis of human fetal and iPSC-derived cone photoreceptor cells. Stem Cell Reports, 9 (6), 1898-1915. (doi:10.1016/j.stemcr.2017.10.018).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Loss of cone photoreceptors, crucial for daylight vision, has the greatest impact on sight in retinal degeneration. Transplantation of stem cell-derived L/M-opsin cones, which form 90% of the human cone population, could provide a feasible therapy to restore vision. However, transcriptomic similarities between fetal and stem cell-derived cones remain to be defined, in addition to development of cone cell purification strategies. Here, we report an analysis of the human L/M-opsin cone photoreceptor transcriptome using an AAV2/9.pR2.1:GFP reporter. This led to the identification of a cone-enriched gene signature, which we used to demonstrate similar gene expression between fetal and stem cell-derived cones. We then defined a cluster of differentiation marker combination that, when used for cell sorting, significantly enriches for cone photoreceptors from the fetal retina and stem cell-derived retinal organoids, respectively. These data may facilitate more efficient isolation of human stem cell-derived cones for use in clinical transplantation studies.

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Accepted/In Press date: 15 October 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 November 2017
Published date: 12 December 2017

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425623
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425623
ISSN: 2213-6711
PURE UUID: 58b4150e-8e35-4db2-a7cc-378b2117e28a
ORCID for Jorn Lakowski: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4214-7580

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Oct 2018 16:30
Last modified: 22 Nov 2021 03:18

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