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Integrated optical components for quantum key distribution

Integrated optical components for quantum key distribution
Integrated optical components for quantum key distribution
The security of current public key cryptosystems, such as RSA, depends on the difficulty of computing certain functions known as trapdoor functions. However, as computational resources become more abundant with the fast development of super- and quantum computers, relying on such methods for communication security becomes risky. Quantum key distribution (QKD), is a potential solution that can allow theoretically secure key exchange for future communications. Chip-scale integration of this solution for securing communication of embedded systems and hand held devices demands miniaturizing the optical components that are used in typical QKD boxes, hence reducing its size and cost. The aim of the work in this thesis is firstly investigating novel approaches to realising integrable single photon sources and detectors for applications such as QKD, and secondly proposing a chip-scale integrated QKD system with efficient and optimised optical components. In the first part of the thesis, a model for coupling 2D material emitters to rod-type photonic cavities is studied for room temperature single photon sources. Our investigated approach allows better coupling between the emitter and the cavity modes than conventional methods, while increasing light collection ratio. In the second part, site-controlled growth of semiconductor III-V nanowires on Si for photodetection applications is achieved by fabricating the sites using electron-beam lithography and wet etching. Studies were also carried out to investigate the effect of the wafer’s growth temperature on the nanowire formation. Finally, a model was proposed for realising a chip-scale QKD system using photonic crystals as a photonic circuit platform. The work involves increasing the Q-factor of the cavity single photon source, increasing cavity waveguide coupling, reducing losses in beam splitters and out-couplers. A final model of a chip-scale QKD system which involves the optimised components is proposed at the end of the thesis.
quantum key distribution, Photonic Crystals, integrated optical devices, Photonics, Single photons and quantum effects
Lancaster University
Noori, Yasir
704d0b70-1ea6-4e00-92ce-cc2543087a09
Noori, Yasir
704d0b70-1ea6-4e00-92ce-cc2543087a09
Young, Robert
bee24f8d-caf2-4842-8cc2-c204a7a5795c
Roedig, Utz
77ec02bf-0a48-4960-b02a-892f27501e6d

Noori, Yasir (2017) Integrated optical components for quantum key distribution. Lancaster University, Doctoral Thesis, 156pp.

Record type: Thesis (Doctoral)

Abstract

The security of current public key cryptosystems, such as RSA, depends on the difficulty of computing certain functions known as trapdoor functions. However, as computational resources become more abundant with the fast development of super- and quantum computers, relying on such methods for communication security becomes risky. Quantum key distribution (QKD), is a potential solution that can allow theoretically secure key exchange for future communications. Chip-scale integration of this solution for securing communication of embedded systems and hand held devices demands miniaturizing the optical components that are used in typical QKD boxes, hence reducing its size and cost. The aim of the work in this thesis is firstly investigating novel approaches to realising integrable single photon sources and detectors for applications such as QKD, and secondly proposing a chip-scale integrated QKD system with efficient and optimised optical components. In the first part of the thesis, a model for coupling 2D material emitters to rod-type photonic cavities is studied for room temperature single photon sources. Our investigated approach allows better coupling between the emitter and the cavity modes than conventional methods, while increasing light collection ratio. In the second part, site-controlled growth of semiconductor III-V nanowires on Si for photodetection applications is achieved by fabricating the sites using electron-beam lithography and wet etching. Studies were also carried out to investigate the effect of the wafer’s growth temperature on the nanowire formation. Finally, a model was proposed for realising a chip-scale QKD system using photonic crystals as a photonic circuit platform. The work involves increasing the Q-factor of the cavity single photon source, increasing cavity waveguide coupling, reducing losses in beam splitters and out-couplers. A final model of a chip-scale QKD system which involves the optimised components is proposed at the end of the thesis.

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More information

Published date: 28 February 2017
Keywords: quantum key distribution, Photonic Crystals, integrated optical devices, Photonics, Single photons and quantum effects

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425666
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425666
PURE UUID: fa8b88ac-9761-4b4a-a4ca-e2e1b7acf86a
ORCID for Yasir Noori: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0001-5285-8779

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Oct 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:21

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Contributors

Author: Yasir Noori ORCID iD
Thesis advisor: Robert Young
Thesis advisor: Utz Roedig

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