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The effect of micro-abrasion on enamel using abrasive slurries

The effect of micro-abrasion on enamel using abrasive slurries
The effect of micro-abrasion on enamel using abrasive slurries
OBJECTIVES
An undesirable outcome of cleaning your teeth is wear of enamel. Tooth brushing is a complex tribological problem with many variables working in combination. The most commonly used abrasive particles in toothpastes are alumina and silica particles with a typical size between 4µm – 12µm. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of size, type and morphology of abrasive particles on the wear of enamel using a micro-abrasion rig and develop an understanding of the magnitude of wear caused by two, three and mixed- mode abrasion.
METHODS
Micro-abrasion testing using a nylon ball was undertaken on bovine enamel disks using a range of slurry concentrations (5 – 20% volume fraction) and loads of 0.5N, 0.2N and 0.1N, to determine wear rates and mechanisms. The slurries consisted of either mono-sized or bimodal, 5µm and 10µm silica and alumina abrasive particles in artificial saliva. Results were interpreted by scar analysis using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).
RESULTS
Mixed mode (2-body grooving with 3-body rolling) abrasion provided higher wear rates than solely 2-body grooving in all the tests. The bimodal tests produced higher wear rates than the single component sized particle tests. This can be explained by a change in wear mechanism from 2-body grooving to mixed-mode. Bimodal silica particle tests caused more wear than bimodal alumina particle tests.

CONCLUSIONS
The highest wear rates were produced by the bimodal particle size distributions due to a shift to mixed-mode abrasion. Mixed mode gave higher wear rates compared to 2-body grooving in all the tests. A change in wear mechanism from 2-body grooving to mixed-mode, resulted in silica producing more wear than alumina.
Baig, Mahdiyyah
c46e3ab7-6912-49e0-9d59-b67443bced9a
Cook, Richard
06f8322d-81be-4f82-9326-19e55541c78f
Pratten, Jonathan
ce275cf5-1aaf-4aac-81dd-d00466d264a0
Wood, Robert
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73
Baig, Mahdiyyah
c46e3ab7-6912-49e0-9d59-b67443bced9a
Cook, Richard
06f8322d-81be-4f82-9326-19e55541c78f
Pratten, Jonathan
ce275cf5-1aaf-4aac-81dd-d00466d264a0
Wood, Robert
d9523d31-41a8-459a-8831-70e29ffe8a73

Baig, Mahdiyyah, Cook, Richard, Pratten, Jonathan and Wood, Robert (2018) The effect of micro-abrasion on enamel using abrasive slurries. International Association of Dental Research: IADR, London, United Kingdom. 25 - 28 Jul 2018.

Record type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES
An undesirable outcome of cleaning your teeth is wear of enamel. Tooth brushing is a complex tribological problem with many variables working in combination. The most commonly used abrasive particles in toothpastes are alumina and silica particles with a typical size between 4µm – 12µm. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of size, type and morphology of abrasive particles on the wear of enamel using a micro-abrasion rig and develop an understanding of the magnitude of wear caused by two, three and mixed- mode abrasion.
METHODS
Micro-abrasion testing using a nylon ball was undertaken on bovine enamel disks using a range of slurry concentrations (5 – 20% volume fraction) and loads of 0.5N, 0.2N and 0.1N, to determine wear rates and mechanisms. The slurries consisted of either mono-sized or bimodal, 5µm and 10µm silica and alumina abrasive particles in artificial saliva. Results were interpreted by scar analysis using the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM).
RESULTS
Mixed mode (2-body grooving with 3-body rolling) abrasion provided higher wear rates than solely 2-body grooving in all the tests. The bimodal tests produced higher wear rates than the single component sized particle tests. This can be explained by a change in wear mechanism from 2-body grooving to mixed-mode. Bimodal silica particle tests caused more wear than bimodal alumina particle tests.

CONCLUSIONS
The highest wear rates were produced by the bimodal particle size distributions due to a shift to mixed-mode abrasion. Mixed mode gave higher wear rates compared to 2-body grooving in all the tests. A change in wear mechanism from 2-body grooving to mixed-mode, resulted in silica producing more wear than alumina.

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More information

Published date: 28 July 2018
Venue - Dates: International Association of Dental Research: IADR, London, United Kingdom, 2018-07-25 - 2018-07-28

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425686
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425686
PURE UUID: 6e546f58-4227-41d2-a27e-42476c926a10
ORCID for Robert Wood: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-0681-9239

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 31 Oct 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:52

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