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The work of writing: raiding the inarticulate

The work of writing: raiding the inarticulate
The work of writing: raiding the inarticulate
This article proposes that two processes are involved in the generation of content during writing: (a) an active, knowledge-constituting process in which content is synthesized by constraints within semantic memory representing the implicit structure of the writer’s understanding, and (b) a reflective, knowledge-transforming process in which content retrieved from episodic memory is manipulated in working memory to satisfy rhetorical goals. It suggests that, although both processes are required for effective writing, the contrasting nature of the implicit organization guiding the constitution of the writer’s understanding and the explicit organization required to satisfy rhetorical goals is the source of a fundamental conflict in writing. The article starts by relating the processes to current models of writing. It outlines how they are combined in a dual-process model and discusses evidence for the model. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications for writing research and the teaching and development of writing.
238-257
Galbraith, David
c4914b0d-4fd1-4127-91aa-4e8afee72ff1
Baaijen, Veerle M.
d40eabe1-a14a-4cd3-a55b-d48bf6d925bf
Galbraith, David
c4914b0d-4fd1-4127-91aa-4e8afee72ff1
Baaijen, Veerle M.
d40eabe1-a14a-4cd3-a55b-d48bf6d925bf

Galbraith, David and Baaijen, Veerle M. (2018) The work of writing: raiding the inarticulate. Educational Psychologist, 53 (4), 238-257. (doi:10.1080/00461520.2018.1505515).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This article proposes that two processes are involved in the generation of content during writing: (a) an active, knowledge-constituting process in which content is synthesized by constraints within semantic memory representing the implicit structure of the writer’s understanding, and (b) a reflective, knowledge-transforming process in which content retrieved from episodic memory is manipulated in working memory to satisfy rhetorical goals. It suggests that, although both processes are required for effective writing, the contrasting nature of the implicit organization guiding the constitution of the writer’s understanding and the explicit organization required to satisfy rhetorical goals is the source of a fundamental conflict in writing. The article starts by relating the processes to current models of writing. It outlines how they are combined in a dual-process model and discusses evidence for the model. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications for writing research and the teaching and development of writing.

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Galbraith Baaijen 2018 The Work of Writing Raiding the Inarticulate - Version of Record
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 25 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 25 October 2018
Published date: 25 October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425716
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425716
PURE UUID: 0a315ba3-5e68-4124-a561-e7e6801ac3e9
ORCID for David Galbraith: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4195-6386

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 01 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 27 Apr 2022 01:56

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Contributors

Author: David Galbraith ORCID iD
Author: Veerle M. Baaijen

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