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Combating chronic bacterial infections by manipulating cyclic nucleotide-regulated biofilm formation

Combating chronic bacterial infections by manipulating cyclic nucleotide-regulated biofilm formation
Combating chronic bacterial infections by manipulating cyclic nucleotide-regulated biofilm formation

Many pathogenic bacteria can form biofilms in clinical settings with major consequences for the progression of infections. Bacterial biofilm communities are typically much more resistant to both antibiotic treatment and clearance by the immune system in comparison to free-living cells. Therefore, drugs that specifically target the formation or maintenance of biofilms would be very valuable additions to current clinical options. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers, in particular cyclic-diguanosine-GMP (c-di-GMP), are now known to play a major role in biofilm formation, and maintenance, in many bacterial species. In this special report, we will review recent progress toward the development of drugs that interfere with c-di-GMP signaling as a route to control biofilm infections. We will focus on the chronic infections associated with the notorious opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although the principles outlined here are also relevant to most bacterial pathogens.

antibiotic resistance, bacterial infection, biofilm formation, cyclic nucleotide signaling, Pseudomonas aeruginosa
1756-8919
949-961
An, Shi Qi
0e05f480-cec1-4c0e-bc1d-359d30ea9a6e
Ryan, Robert P.
cd9f1e35-9ffe-456f-a64e-798b1f520298
An, Shi Qi
0e05f480-cec1-4c0e-bc1d-359d30ea9a6e
Ryan, Robert P.
cd9f1e35-9ffe-456f-a64e-798b1f520298

An, Shi Qi and Ryan, Robert P. (2016) Combating chronic bacterial infections by manipulating cyclic nucleotide-regulated biofilm formation. Future Medicinal Chemistry, 8 (9), 949-961. (doi:10.4155/fmc-2015-0002).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Many pathogenic bacteria can form biofilms in clinical settings with major consequences for the progression of infections. Bacterial biofilm communities are typically much more resistant to both antibiotic treatment and clearance by the immune system in comparison to free-living cells. Therefore, drugs that specifically target the formation or maintenance of biofilms would be very valuable additions to current clinical options. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers, in particular cyclic-diguanosine-GMP (c-di-GMP), are now known to play a major role in biofilm formation, and maintenance, in many bacterial species. In this special report, we will review recent progress toward the development of drugs that interfere with c-di-GMP signaling as a route to control biofilm infections. We will focus on the chronic infections associated with the notorious opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although the principles outlined here are also relevant to most bacterial pathogens.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 15 June 2016
Published date: June 2016
Keywords: antibiotic resistance, bacterial infection, biofilm formation, cyclic nucleotide signaling, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425826
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425826
ISSN: 1756-8919
PURE UUID: b32cd337-c09e-409a-801b-0ed863238fa3

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 05 Nov 2018 17:30

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