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Microbiome characteristics of induced sputum compared to bronchial fluid and upper airway samples

Microbiome characteristics of induced sputum compared to bronchial fluid and upper airway samples
Microbiome characteristics of induced sputum compared to bronchial fluid and upper airway samples

Objective: The study of the community of microorganisms (the microbiota) in the lower airways in children is restricted to opportunistic sampling in children undergoing elective general anaesthetic. Here we tested the hypothesis that induced sputum is a valid alternative to directly sampling the lower airways to study lower airway microbiota. Methods: Children scheduled for elective operations were recruited. Pre-operatively a sample of induced sputum was obtained. After anaesthesia was induced, a bronchial brushing and swabs of the upper respiratory tract were obtained. Bacterial community analysis was performed by amplification of the V3–V4 16S rRNA gene region. Results: Twenty children were recruited, mean age 10.7 years. Induced sputum samples were obtained from 12 children, bronchial brushing from 14 and nasal, mouth, and throat samples in 15, 16, and 17 children. The profile of bacterial communities was similar in the mouth, throat, and sputum samples with the nose and bronchial samples being different. Actinobacteria species dominated the nose and mouth, Fusobacteria were the dominant species in the throat and sputum while Proteobacteria species dominated in bronchial samples. Forty-one percent of detected bacteria in bronchial samples were unclassified. Bacterial communities from the mouth, throat, and induced sputum were tightly clustered and were distinct from nose and those found in bronchial communities. Conclusions: Induced sputum may not be a valid surrogate for microbiome assessment of the lower airways in all individuals. Many bacteria in bronchial samples were not recognized by standard testing, suggesting that our understanding of the lower airway microbiota in children remains rudimentary.

bronchial fluid, child, microbiota, sputum
8755-6863
921-928
An, Shi qi
0e05f480-cec1-4c0e-bc1d-359d30ea9a6e
Warris, Adilia
f76a0dea-f2f4-4899-9e43-57e87e4caef1
Turner, Steve
5ece7027-a2ba-4cd7-a710-6f4b823dba9a
An, Shi qi
0e05f480-cec1-4c0e-bc1d-359d30ea9a6e
Warris, Adilia
f76a0dea-f2f4-4899-9e43-57e87e4caef1
Turner, Steve
5ece7027-a2ba-4cd7-a710-6f4b823dba9a

An, Shi qi, Warris, Adilia and Turner, Steve (2018) Microbiome characteristics of induced sputum compared to bronchial fluid and upper airway samples. Pediatric Pulmonology, 53 (7), 921-928. (doi:10.1002/ppul.24037).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: The study of the community of microorganisms (the microbiota) in the lower airways in children is restricted to opportunistic sampling in children undergoing elective general anaesthetic. Here we tested the hypothesis that induced sputum is a valid alternative to directly sampling the lower airways to study lower airway microbiota. Methods: Children scheduled for elective operations were recruited. Pre-operatively a sample of induced sputum was obtained. After anaesthesia was induced, a bronchial brushing and swabs of the upper respiratory tract were obtained. Bacterial community analysis was performed by amplification of the V3–V4 16S rRNA gene region. Results: Twenty children were recruited, mean age 10.7 years. Induced sputum samples were obtained from 12 children, bronchial brushing from 14 and nasal, mouth, and throat samples in 15, 16, and 17 children. The profile of bacterial communities was similar in the mouth, throat, and sputum samples with the nose and bronchial samples being different. Actinobacteria species dominated the nose and mouth, Fusobacteria were the dominant species in the throat and sputum while Proteobacteria species dominated in bronchial samples. Forty-one percent of detected bacteria in bronchial samples were unclassified. Bacterial communities from the mouth, throat, and induced sputum were tightly clustered and were distinct from nose and those found in bronchial communities. Conclusions: Induced sputum may not be a valid surrogate for microbiome assessment of the lower airways in all individuals. Many bacteria in bronchial samples were not recognized by standard testing, suggesting that our understanding of the lower airway microbiota in children remains rudimentary.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 30 March 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 4 May 2018
Published date: 1 July 2018
Keywords: bronchial fluid, child, microbiota, sputum

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425833
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425833
ISSN: 8755-6863
PURE UUID: 47ebc350-93de-47d9-95ab-9a4d5cf5642f

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 05 Nov 2018 17:30

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Contributors

Author: Shi qi An
Author: Adilia Warris
Author: Steve Turner

University divisions

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