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Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

Stenotrophomonas maltophilia
Stenotrophomonas maltophilia

[Figure presented] This infographic describes the key regulated traits of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, important for beneficial plant interactions, and also its increasing incidence as a nosocomial and community-acquired infection. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a cosmopolitan and ubiquitous bacterium found in a range of environmental habitats, including extreme ones, although in nature it is mainly associated with plants. S. maltophilia fulfils important ecosystem functions in the sulfur and nitrogen cycles, in degradation of complex compounds and pollutants, and in promoti on of plant growth and health. Stenotrophomonas can also colonize extreme man-made niches in hospitals, space shuttles, and clean rooms. S. maltophilia has emerged as a global opportunistic human pathogen, which does not usually infect healthy hosts but is associated with high morbidity and mortality in severely immunocompromised and debilitated individuals. S. maltophilia can also be recovered from polymicrobial infections, most notably from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Close relatives of S. maltophilia, for example, S. rhizophila, provide a harmless alternative for biotechnological applications without human health risks.

0966-842X
637-638
An, Shi qi
0e05f480-cec1-4c0e-bc1d-359d30ea9a6e
Berg, Gabriele
5bc6c28c-525d-4f45-b167-5af82c888c6d
An, Shi qi
0e05f480-cec1-4c0e-bc1d-359d30ea9a6e
Berg, Gabriele
5bc6c28c-525d-4f45-b167-5af82c888c6d

An, Shi qi and Berg, Gabriele (2018) Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Trends in Microbiology, 26 (7), 637-638. (doi:10.1016/j.tim.2018.04.006).

Record type: Review

Abstract

[Figure presented] This infographic describes the key regulated traits of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, important for beneficial plant interactions, and also its increasing incidence as a nosocomial and community-acquired infection. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a cosmopolitan and ubiquitous bacterium found in a range of environmental habitats, including extreme ones, although in nature it is mainly associated with plants. S. maltophilia fulfils important ecosystem functions in the sulfur and nitrogen cycles, in degradation of complex compounds and pollutants, and in promoti on of plant growth and health. Stenotrophomonas can also colonize extreme man-made niches in hospitals, space shuttles, and clean rooms. S. maltophilia has emerged as a global opportunistic human pathogen, which does not usually infect healthy hosts but is associated with high morbidity and mortality in severely immunocompromised and debilitated individuals. S. maltophilia can also be recovered from polymicrobial infections, most notably from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Close relatives of S. maltophilia, for example, S. rhizophila, provide a harmless alternative for biotechnological applications without human health risks.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 10 May 2018
Published date: 1 July 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425834
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425834
ISSN: 0966-842X
PURE UUID: 00a5755b-abba-450c-a76c-acfa33521772

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 05 Nov 2018 17:30

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