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Frequency bands for ultrasound, suitable for the consideration of its health effects

Frequency bands for ultrasound, suitable for the consideration of its health effects
Frequency bands for ultrasound, suitable for the consideration of its health effects

It is proposed that the ultrasound frequency spectrum should be divided into three bands in order to facilitate a more rational assessment of its health effects. Whilst statement of the frequencies at the borders of these bands facilitates their definition, it is recognized that these observables vary continuously with frequency and consequently these border frequencies should not be used to rule out the possibility of a given effect occurring. The lowest band, US(A), lies between 17.8 and 500 kHz. In this band acoustic cavitation and its associated forces form the dominant process resulting in biological effects in liquids and soft tissues, whereas health effects from airborne ultrasound have been reported but are far less researched. In the middle band, US(B), between 500 kHz and 100 MHz, temperature rise in tissues becomes the most important biological effect of exposure. The highest band, US(C), covers frequencies above 100 MHz, for which the radiation force becomes an increasingly important biophysical mechanism. A justification for the selection of 17.8 kHz in preference to any other threshold for the lower frequency limit for ultra-sound is given.
0001-4966
2490-2500
Duck, Francis
78d194a5-ce10-4f10-8982-c6ab04251979
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae
Duck, Francis
78d194a5-ce10-4f10-8982-c6ab04251979
Leighton, Timothy
3e5262ce-1d7d-42eb-b013-fcc5c286bbae

Duck, Francis and Leighton, Timothy (2018) Frequency bands for ultrasound, suitable for the consideration of its health effects. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 144 (4), 2490-2500. (doi:10.1121/1.5063578).

Record type: Article

Abstract


It is proposed that the ultrasound frequency spectrum should be divided into three bands in order to facilitate a more rational assessment of its health effects. Whilst statement of the frequencies at the borders of these bands facilitates their definition, it is recognized that these observables vary continuously with frequency and consequently these border frequencies should not be used to rule out the possibility of a given effect occurring. The lowest band, US(A), lies between 17.8 and 500 kHz. In this band acoustic cavitation and its associated forces form the dominant process resulting in biological effects in liquids and soft tissues, whereas health effects from airborne ultrasound have been reported but are far less researched. In the middle band, US(B), between 500 kHz and 100 MHz, temperature rise in tissues becomes the most important biological effect of exposure. The highest band, US(C), covers frequencies above 100 MHz, for which the radiation force becomes an increasingly important biophysical mechanism. A justification for the selection of 17.8 kHz in preference to any other threshold for the lower frequency limit for ultra-sound is given.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 5 September 2017
e-pub ahead of print date: 31 October 2018
Published date: October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425849
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425849
ISSN: 0001-4966
PURE UUID: 65698536-9519-4fb6-89d4-5eac878d8ed5
ORCID for Timothy Leighton: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1649-8750

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 05 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 07 Oct 2020 06:29

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