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A cross-syndrome comparison of sleep-dependent learning on a cognitive procedural task

A cross-syndrome comparison of sleep-dependent learning on a cognitive procedural task
A cross-syndrome comparison of sleep-dependent learning on a cognitive procedural task
Sleep plays a key role in the consolidation of newly acquired information and skills into long term memory. Children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) frequently experience sleep problems, abnormal sleep architecture and difficulties with learning; thus, we predicted that children from these clinical populations would demonstrate impairments in sleep-dependent memory consolidation relative to children with typical development (TD) on a cognitive procedural task: The Tower of Hanoi. Children with DS (n = 17), WS (n = 22) and TD (n = 34) completed the Tower of Hanoi task. They were trained on the task either in the morning or evening, then completed it again following counterbalanced retention intervals of daytime wake and night time sleep. Children with TD and with WS benefitted from sleep for enhanced memory consolidation and improved their performance on the task by reducing the number of moves taken to completion, and by making fewer rule violations. We did not find any large effects of sleep on learning in children with DS, suggesting that these children are not only delayed, but atypical in their learning strategies. Importantly, our findings have implications for educational strategies for all children, specifically considering circadian influences on new learning and the role of children’s night time sleep as an aid to learning.
2326-6988
339-353
Hill, Catherine
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Joyce, Anna
d1a82273-7d20-4c88-bb27-671c75652f85
Dimitriou, Dagmara
e0254a64-7764-4533-886b-93597d8ca7c9
Karmiloff-Smith, Annette
b205fed0-9a5f-4384-8c4d-5cddf8063578
Hill, Catherine
867cd0a0-dabc-4152-b4bf-8e9fbc0edf8d
Joyce, Anna
d1a82273-7d20-4c88-bb27-671c75652f85
Dimitriou, Dagmara
e0254a64-7764-4533-886b-93597d8ca7c9
Karmiloff-Smith, Annette
b205fed0-9a5f-4384-8c4d-5cddf8063578

Hill, Catherine, Joyce, Anna, Dimitriou, Dagmara and Karmiloff-Smith, Annette (2019) A cross-syndrome comparison of sleep-dependent learning on a cognitive procedural task. American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, 124 (4), 339-353. (doi:10.1352/1944-7558-124.4.339).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Sleep plays a key role in the consolidation of newly acquired information and skills into long term memory. Children with Down syndrome (DS) and Williams syndrome (WS) frequently experience sleep problems, abnormal sleep architecture and difficulties with learning; thus, we predicted that children from these clinical populations would demonstrate impairments in sleep-dependent memory consolidation relative to children with typical development (TD) on a cognitive procedural task: The Tower of Hanoi. Children with DS (n = 17), WS (n = 22) and TD (n = 34) completed the Tower of Hanoi task. They were trained on the task either in the morning or evening, then completed it again following counterbalanced retention intervals of daytime wake and night time sleep. Children with TD and with WS benefitted from sleep for enhanced memory consolidation and improved their performance on the task by reducing the number of moves taken to completion, and by making fewer rule violations. We did not find any large effects of sleep on learning in children with DS, suggesting that these children are not only delayed, but atypical in their learning strategies. Importantly, our findings have implications for educational strategies for all children, specifically considering circadian influences on new learning and the role of children’s night time sleep as an aid to learning.

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Joyce et al. 2018. A cross-syndrome comparison of sleep-dependent learning on a cognitive procedural task - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 22 October 2018
Published date: July 2019

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Local EPrints ID: 425862
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425862
ISSN: 2326-6988
PURE UUID: 05c3751b-0db0-4e1e-a835-e67ccbe8117a
ORCID for Catherine Hill: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2372-5904

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Date deposited: 05 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 24 Jan 2020 05:02

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Author: Catherine Hill ORCID iD
Author: Anna Joyce
Author: Dagmara Dimitriou
Author: Annette Karmiloff-Smith

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