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Self-management of a musculoskeletal condition for people from harder to reach groups: a qualitative patient interview study

Self-management of a musculoskeletal condition for people from harder to reach groups: a qualitative patient interview study
Self-management of a musculoskeletal condition for people from harder to reach groups: a qualitative patient interview study
Background: this study recorded the functional health literacy levels of people with musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions from harder to reach groups and explored their experiences in engaging with health care professionals to self-manage their MSK condition.

Methods: we recruited participants, identified by key health and social care contacts as likely to have lower health literacy levels, and used semi-structured interviews to collect data. Thematic analysis was used to identify the main key themes arising from the transcribed interviews.

Results: eighteen participants were identified and recruited from harder to reach community populations, 10 were scored as having inadequate functional health literacy on the Short Form Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy Measure. Three themes were identified in relation to participants’ experiences of MSK self-management approaches: engaging with health care services; interpreting the health care providers’ message; and facilitating participation in MSK self-management.

Conclusions: our findings indicate that people with a MSK condition, from harder to reach groups, experience multi-morbidity, find health care systems complicated and hear from health care professionals that their MSK condition cannot be cured. People interpreted that a lack of cure meant that nothing could be done to help their MSK pain. Engaging with self-management strategies was not seen as a priority for our participants. Strategies to simplify health communication, more time to process health information and supportive social networks helped our participants to understand and manage their MSK health on a day-to-day basis.
0963-8288
Adams, Joanna
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Lowe, Wendy A
52e7ece8-e94a-4501-842d-a0df2d6ce568
Protheroe, Joanne
ef666365-4f77-4c8c-9471-967b084dff81
Lueddeke, Jill
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Armstrong, Ray
496b7c78-3799-4913-a570-7f80e4464c1a
Russell, Cynthia
7004bba9-a609-47ed-9b7c-898eb3f2caa1
Nutbeam, Donald
352dc808-9160-42e7-8b52-b8cac02ad486
Ballinger, Claire
1495742c-90aa-4074-920e-95e6cc3d5380
Adams, Joanna
6e38b8bb-9467-4585-86e4-14062b02bcba
Lowe, Wendy A
52e7ece8-e94a-4501-842d-a0df2d6ce568
Protheroe, Joanne
ef666365-4f77-4c8c-9471-967b084dff81
Lueddeke, Jill
2cd92490-8d28-4278-aa3d-baa00603da62
Armstrong, Ray
496b7c78-3799-4913-a570-7f80e4464c1a
Russell, Cynthia
7004bba9-a609-47ed-9b7c-898eb3f2caa1
Nutbeam, Donald
352dc808-9160-42e7-8b52-b8cac02ad486
Ballinger, Claire
1495742c-90aa-4074-920e-95e6cc3d5380

Adams, Joanna, Lowe, Wendy A, Protheroe, Joanne, Lueddeke, Jill, Armstrong, Ray, Russell, Cynthia, Nutbeam, Donald and Ballinger, Claire (2018) Self-management of a musculoskeletal condition for people from harder to reach groups: a qualitative patient interview study. Disability and Rehabilitation. (doi:10.1080/09638288.2018.1485182).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Background: this study recorded the functional health literacy levels of people with musculoskeletal (MSK) conditions from harder to reach groups and explored their experiences in engaging with health care professionals to self-manage their MSK condition.

Methods: we recruited participants, identified by key health and social care contacts as likely to have lower health literacy levels, and used semi-structured interviews to collect data. Thematic analysis was used to identify the main key themes arising from the transcribed interviews.

Results: eighteen participants were identified and recruited from harder to reach community populations, 10 were scored as having inadequate functional health literacy on the Short Form Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy Measure. Three themes were identified in relation to participants’ experiences of MSK self-management approaches: engaging with health care services; interpreting the health care providers’ message; and facilitating participation in MSK self-management.

Conclusions: our findings indicate that people with a MSK condition, from harder to reach groups, experience multi-morbidity, find health care systems complicated and hear from health care professionals that their MSK condition cannot be cured. People interpreted that a lack of cure meant that nothing could be done to help their MSK pain. Engaging with self-management strategies was not seen as a priority for our participants. Strategies to simplify health communication, more time to process health information and supportive social networks helped our participants to understand and manage their MSK health on a day-to-day basis.

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Accepted/In Press date: 3 June 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425890
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425890
ISSN: 0963-8288
PURE UUID: b076f0b3-4f12-4af0-8959-c4644493358a
ORCID for Joanna Adams: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1765-7060

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Date deposited: 06 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 17 Aug 2019 00:39

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