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Non-destructive 3D imaging and quantification of hydrated biofilm-sediment aggregates using X-ray micro-computed tomography

Non-destructive 3D imaging and quantification of hydrated biofilm-sediment aggregates using X-ray micro-computed tomography
Non-destructive 3D imaging and quantification of hydrated biofilm-sediment aggregates using X-ray micro-computed tomography
Biofilm-sediment aggregate (BSA) contains a high water content, either within internal pores and channels, or bound by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) forming a highly hydrated biofilm matrix. Desiccation of BSAs alters the biofilm morphology and thus the physical characteristics of porous media, such as the binding matrix within BSA and internal pore geometry. Observing BSAs in their naturally hydrated form is essential but hampered due to the lack of techniques for imaging and discerning hydrated materials. Generally, imagery techniques (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam nano-tomography (FIB-nt)) involve the desiccation of BSAs (freeze-drying or acetone dehydration), or prevents differentiation between BSA components such as inorganic particles and pore water (confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM)). Here, we propose a novel methodology that simultaneously achieves the 3D visualization and quantification of BSAs and their components in their hydrated form at a sub-micron scale using X-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT). It enables the high-resolution detection of comparable morphology of multi-phase components within a hydrated aggregate: each single inorganic particle and the hydrated biofilm matrix. This allows the estimation of aggregate density and the illustration of biofilm-sediment binding matrix. This information provides valuable insights into investigations of the transport of BSAs and aggregate-associated sediment particles, contaminants (such as microplastics), organic carbon, and their impacts on aquatic biogeochemical cycling.
0013-936X
13306-13313
Zhang, Naiyu
9af1e237-8e4a-4008-af76-ee29007aa7fb
Thompson, Charlotte E.L.
2a304aa6-761e-4d99-b227-cedb67129bfb
Townend, Ian H.
f72e5186-cae8-41fd-8712-d5746f78328e
Rankin, Kathryn E.
d9516566-0ad8-473d-b99b-4683c663a2b7
Paterson, David M.
2793dd09-9543-49bd-a3ac-6a34a1989234
Manning, Andrew J.
f0e7eb29-241b-494b-b3e6-f76478d33b40
Zhang, Naiyu
9af1e237-8e4a-4008-af76-ee29007aa7fb
Thompson, Charlotte E.L.
2a304aa6-761e-4d99-b227-cedb67129bfb
Townend, Ian H.
f72e5186-cae8-41fd-8712-d5746f78328e
Rankin, Kathryn E.
d9516566-0ad8-473d-b99b-4683c663a2b7
Paterson, David M.
2793dd09-9543-49bd-a3ac-6a34a1989234
Manning, Andrew J.
f0e7eb29-241b-494b-b3e6-f76478d33b40

Zhang, Naiyu, Thompson, Charlotte E.L., Townend, Ian H., Rankin, Kathryn E., Paterson, David M. and Manning, Andrew J. (2018) Non-destructive 3D imaging and quantification of hydrated biofilm-sediment aggregates using X-ray micro-computed tomography. Environmental Science & Technology, 52 (22), 13306-13313. (doi:10.1021/acs.est.8b03997).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Biofilm-sediment aggregate (BSA) contains a high water content, either within internal pores and channels, or bound by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) forming a highly hydrated biofilm matrix. Desiccation of BSAs alters the biofilm morphology and thus the physical characteristics of porous media, such as the binding matrix within BSA and internal pore geometry. Observing BSAs in their naturally hydrated form is essential but hampered due to the lack of techniques for imaging and discerning hydrated materials. Generally, imagery techniques (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and focused ion beam nano-tomography (FIB-nt)) involve the desiccation of BSAs (freeze-drying or acetone dehydration), or prevents differentiation between BSA components such as inorganic particles and pore water (confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM)). Here, we propose a novel methodology that simultaneously achieves the 3D visualization and quantification of BSAs and their components in their hydrated form at a sub-micron scale using X-ray micro-computed tomography (µ-CT). It enables the high-resolution detection of comparable morphology of multi-phase components within a hydrated aggregate: each single inorganic particle and the hydrated biofilm matrix. This allows the estimation of aggregate density and the illustration of biofilm-sediment binding matrix. This information provides valuable insights into investigations of the transport of BSAs and aggregate-associated sediment particles, contaminants (such as microplastics), organic carbon, and their impacts on aquatic biogeochemical cycling.

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EST_Nondestructive 3D Imaging - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 24 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 October 2018
Published date: 24 October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425902
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425902
ISSN: 0013-936X
PURE UUID: 156cd140-8e0c-4924-8c2a-b0f3c0429cd7
ORCID for Ian H. Townend: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-2101-3858

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Date deposited: 06 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 11 Mar 2020 05:01

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Contributors

Author: Naiyu Zhang
Author: Ian H. Townend ORCID iD
Author: Kathryn E. Rankin
Author: David M. Paterson
Author: Andrew J. Manning

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