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Does allergy explain why some children have severe asthma?

Does allergy explain why some children have severe asthma?
Does allergy explain why some children have severe asthma?

Asthma is a common disease in childhood with a minority of affected children having severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA). Children with STRA can be differentiated from those with mild-moderate disease by greater allergic sensitization, increased eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased airway remodelling and reduced corticosteroid responsiveness. The aetiology of STRA in children is multifactorial but allergy seems to play a key role. Many children with asthma have coexisting allergic disease, and severe rhinitis seems to be an important driver of STRA in children. Allergies to foods, moulds, pollen and pets have also been associated with severe asthma exacerbations. Identifying allergens that are driving asthma symptoms in children with STRA may provide additional strategies for improving their disease control. Avoidance strategies may be possible. Additional monoclonal antibody therapy with Omalizumab or Mepolizumab may be helpful in children with clinically important polysensitization.

0954-7894
1594-1605
Bonner, Katie
a07914de-8fea-4482-8f6c-21cc37292259
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3
Bonner, Katie
a07914de-8fea-4482-8f6c-21cc37292259
Roberts, Graham
ea00db4e-84e7-4b39-8273-9b71dbd7e2f3

Bonner, Katie and Roberts, Graham (2018) Does allergy explain why some children have severe asthma? Clinical & Experimental Allergy, 48 (12), 1594-1605. (doi:10.1111/cea.13234).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Asthma is a common disease in childhood with a minority of affected children having severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA). Children with STRA can be differentiated from those with mild-moderate disease by greater allergic sensitization, increased eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased airway remodelling and reduced corticosteroid responsiveness. The aetiology of STRA in children is multifactorial but allergy seems to play a key role. Many children with asthma have coexisting allergic disease, and severe rhinitis seems to be an important driver of STRA in children. Allergies to foods, moulds, pollen and pets have also been associated with severe asthma exacerbations. Identifying allergens that are driving asthma symptoms in children with STRA may provide additional strategies for improving their disease control. Avoidance strategies may be possible. Additional monoclonal antibody therapy with Omalizumab or Mepolizumab may be helpful in children with clinically important polysensitization.

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Does allergy explain why some children have severe asthma - Accepted Manuscript
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Accepted/In Press date: 15 July 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 17 July 2018
Published date: December 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 425956
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/425956
ISSN: 0954-7894
PURE UUID: 8a1d6f06-0fb3-41a5-a692-b21dbc58e75d

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Date deposited: 07 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 17 Dec 2019 05:09

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Contributors

Author: Katie Bonner
Author: Graham Roberts

University divisions

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