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Unpicking motives to purchase locally-produced food: analysis of direct and moderation effects

Unpicking motives to purchase locally-produced food: analysis of direct and moderation effects
Unpicking motives to purchase locally-produced food: analysis of direct and moderation effects
Purpose
– This study aims to investigate how attributes associated with local food (intrinsic product quality; local support) motivate purchase behaviour. Previous research assumes heterogeneity in consumer motivation, but this has never been formally assessed. As such, the influence of local food attributes in motivating product use is integrated into a model in which consumer values and personal characteristics/situational variables are specified as moderators.

Design/methodology/approach
– Eight hypotheses are tested using data collected from a quota sample of respondents recruited via an online panel of 1,223 shoppers. A three-stage analysis is used using structural equation modelling. Moderation effects are tested using both latent interactions and multiple-group analysis.

Findings
– Shoppers purchase local food more frequently as a consequence of local support rather than intrinsic product quality. Unpicking these relationships reveal that local support has an amplified effect when local identity is higher, and when the shopper is either female or of an older age (55 years plus). Surprisingly, the influence of intrinsic product quality is equivalent by gender, age and location (rural/urban).

Practical implications
– Marketers promoting locally produced foods should focus on both the intrinsic attributes of local food as well as the role it plays within the local community. The latter is more likely to be successful with communications aimed at women and older consumers.

Originality/value
– With previous studies focusing on how local food attributes influence favourable consumer behaviours, the current study unpicks these relationships by examining heterogeneity in responses. This is the first study to concurrently use attributes, values and personal characteristics/situational variables in explaining shopping behaviour for local food.
0309-0566
1207-1233
Memery, Juliet
a734de3a-f12d-4394-bfe1-911c4ea30a04
Angell, Robert
ca8389e4-2a83-43a8-b331-c262eda37674
Megicks, Philip
5330ca01-abb8-4e41-b079-07c1e7656336
Lindgreen, Adam
ba6497d4-ca0b-4aac-9ab6-9ba6111f9e17
Memery, Juliet
a734de3a-f12d-4394-bfe1-911c4ea30a04
Angell, Robert
ca8389e4-2a83-43a8-b331-c262eda37674
Megicks, Philip
5330ca01-abb8-4e41-b079-07c1e7656336
Lindgreen, Adam
ba6497d4-ca0b-4aac-9ab6-9ba6111f9e17

Memery, Juliet, Angell, Robert, Megicks, Philip and Lindgreen, Adam (2015) Unpicking motives to purchase locally-produced food: analysis of direct and moderation effects. European Journal of Marketing, 49 (7/8), 1207-1233. (doi:10.1108/EJM-02-2014-0075).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose
– This study aims to investigate how attributes associated with local food (intrinsic product quality; local support) motivate purchase behaviour. Previous research assumes heterogeneity in consumer motivation, but this has never been formally assessed. As such, the influence of local food attributes in motivating product use is integrated into a model in which consumer values and personal characteristics/situational variables are specified as moderators.

Design/methodology/approach
– Eight hypotheses are tested using data collected from a quota sample of respondents recruited via an online panel of 1,223 shoppers. A three-stage analysis is used using structural equation modelling. Moderation effects are tested using both latent interactions and multiple-group analysis.

Findings
– Shoppers purchase local food more frequently as a consequence of local support rather than intrinsic product quality. Unpicking these relationships reveal that local support has an amplified effect when local identity is higher, and when the shopper is either female or of an older age (55 years plus). Surprisingly, the influence of intrinsic product quality is equivalent by gender, age and location (rural/urban).

Practical implications
– Marketers promoting locally produced foods should focus on both the intrinsic attributes of local food as well as the role it plays within the local community. The latter is more likely to be successful with communications aimed at women and older consumers.

Originality/value
– With previous studies focusing on how local food attributes influence favourable consumer behaviours, the current study unpicks these relationships by examining heterogeneity in responses. This is the first study to concurrently use attributes, values and personal characteristics/situational variables in explaining shopping behaviour for local food.

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More information

Published date: 3 July 2015

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426007
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426007
ISSN: 0309-0566
PURE UUID: d90836b3-73af-4771-878c-9e0296f9e1ab

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 09 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 09 Nov 2021 14:28

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Contributors

Author: Juliet Memery
Author: Robert Angell
Author: Philip Megicks
Author: Adam Lindgreen

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