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Current and expected economic hardship and satisfaction with family life in Europe

Current and expected economic hardship and satisfaction with family life in Europe
Current and expected economic hardship and satisfaction with family life in Europe
This study investigated how people’s satisfaction with their family life is influenced by economic circumstances. Expectations were formulated that people who experienced or expected economic hardship would be less satisfied with their family life. Additionally, it was hypothesized that current and expected economic hardship would amplify each other’s consequences on satisfaction, and that current and expected economic hardship was more harmful for people with children and when the rise of unemployment in a country was larger. Multilevel analyses were conducted using a sample from the European Quality of Life Survey 2012 (N = 13,013 in 30 countries). Results indeed indicated that people who experienced or expected economic hardship were less satisfied with their family life. Expecting a financial decline was (slightly) more harmful for people in larger families. Generally, current and expected economic problems were not more harmful for parents or when a country’s rise of unemployment was larger.
0192-513X
3-32
Blom, Niels
86fa14cb-1402-453f-a01c-3c919925baae
Kraaykamp, Gerbert
b5f7aea6-c71f-449e-8818-a2d51c534819
Verbakel, Ellen
6356d2c2-c585-4cc0-9e63-ee1f69547277
Blom, Niels
86fa14cb-1402-453f-a01c-3c919925baae
Kraaykamp, Gerbert
b5f7aea6-c71f-449e-8818-a2d51c534819
Verbakel, Ellen
6356d2c2-c585-4cc0-9e63-ee1f69547277

Blom, Niels, Kraaykamp, Gerbert and Verbakel, Ellen (2019) Current and expected economic hardship and satisfaction with family life in Europe. Journal of Family Issues, 40 (1), 3-32. (doi:10.1177/0192513X18802328).

Record type: Article

Abstract

This study investigated how people’s satisfaction with their family life is influenced by economic circumstances. Expectations were formulated that people who experienced or expected economic hardship would be less satisfied with their family life. Additionally, it was hypothesized that current and expected economic hardship would amplify each other’s consequences on satisfaction, and that current and expected economic hardship was more harmful for people with children and when the rise of unemployment in a country was larger. Multilevel analyses were conducted using a sample from the European Quality of Life Survey 2012 (N = 13,013 in 30 countries). Results indeed indicated that people who experienced or expected economic hardship were less satisfied with their family life. Expecting a financial decline was (slightly) more harmful for people in larger families. Generally, current and expected economic problems were not more harmful for parents or when a country’s rise of unemployment was larger.

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Accepted/In Press date: 24 August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 September 2018
Published date: 1 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426095
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426095
ISSN: 0192-513X
PURE UUID: d4ee1745-fbd8-410b-89c2-8dd5ecf0abb5

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Date deposited: 14 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:50

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Contributors

Author: Niels Blom
Author: Gerbert Kraaykamp
Author: Ellen Verbakel

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