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Jurisdiction and the internet: Regulatory competence over online activity

Jurisdiction and the internet: Regulatory competence over online activity
Jurisdiction and the internet: Regulatory competence over online activity
Which state has and should have the right and power to regulate sites and online events? Who can apply their defamation or contract law, obscenity standards, gambling or banking regulation, pharmaceutical licensing requirements or hate speech prohibitions to any particular Internet activity? Traditionally, transnational activity has been 'shared out' between national sovereigns with the aid of location-centric rules which can be adjusted to the transnational Internet. But can these allocation rules be stretched indefinitely, and what are the costs for online actors and for states themselves of squeezing global online activity into nation-state law? Does the future of online regulation lie in global legal harmonisation or is it a cyberspace that increasingly mirrors the national borders of the offline world? This book offers some uncomfortable insights into one of the most important debates on Internet governance.
public international law, Private International Law, cyberspace, Conflict of laws
Cambridge University Press
Kohl, Uta
813ff335-441f-4027-801b-4e6fc48409c3
Kohl, Uta
813ff335-441f-4027-801b-4e6fc48409c3

Kohl, Uta (2007) Jurisdiction and the internet: Regulatory competence over online activity , Cambridge. Cambridge University Press, 346pp.

Record type: Book

Abstract

Which state has and should have the right and power to regulate sites and online events? Who can apply their defamation or contract law, obscenity standards, gambling or banking regulation, pharmaceutical licensing requirements or hate speech prohibitions to any particular Internet activity? Traditionally, transnational activity has been 'shared out' between national sovereigns with the aid of location-centric rules which can be adjusted to the transnational Internet. But can these allocation rules be stretched indefinitely, and what are the costs for online actors and for states themselves of squeezing global online activity into nation-state law? Does the future of online regulation lie in global legal harmonisation or is it a cyberspace that increasingly mirrors the national borders of the offline world? This book offers some uncomfortable insights into one of the most important debates on Internet governance.

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Published date: 1 January 2007
Keywords: public international law, Private International Law, cyberspace, Conflict of laws

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426100
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426100
PURE UUID: 84b9dde6-9e58-45d4-9bc1-d782b6a191ab

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Date deposited: 14 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Nov 2018 17:30

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