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A systematic review of the safety and efficacy of aerobic exercise during cytotoxic chemotherapy treatment

A systematic review of the safety and efficacy of aerobic exercise during cytotoxic chemotherapy treatment
A systematic review of the safety and efficacy of aerobic exercise during cytotoxic chemotherapy treatment
Purpose:

Aerobic exercise improves prognosis and quality of life (QoL) following completion of chemotherapy. However, the safety and efficacy of aerobic exercise during chemotherapy is less certain. A systematic review was performed of randomised trials of adult patients undergoing chemotherapy, comparing an exercise intervention with standard care.

Method:

From 253 abstracts screened, 33 unique trials were appraised in accordance with PRISMA guidance, including 3257 patients. Interventions included walking, jogging or cycling, and 23 were of moderate intensity (50–80% maximum heart rate).

Results:

Aerobic exercise improved, or at least maintained fitness during chemotherapy. Moderately intense exercise, up to 70–80% of maximum heart rate, was safe. Any reported adverse effects of exercise were mild and self-limiting, but reporting was inconsistent. Adherence was good (median 72%). Exercise improved QoL and physical functioning, with earlier return to work. Two out of four studies reported improved chemotherapy completion rates. Four out of six studies reported reduced chemotherapy toxicity. There was no evidence that exercise reduced myelosuppression or improved response rate or survival.

Conclusions:

Exercise during chemotherapy is safe and should be encouraged because of beneficial effects on QoL and physical functioning. More research is required to determine the impact on chemotherapy completion rates and prognosis.
0941-4355
3337-3351
Cave, J.
fa0405c9-9597-43f6-a9f4-b9ec5fb7268f
Paschalis, A.
e7626e9f-172b-4da2-882c-bddb219f3fb6
Huang, C.Y.
c92978b9-74f2-4078-bfee-5d6ee8128e8c
West, M.
98b67e58-9875-4133-b236-8a10a0a12c04
Copson, E.
a94cdbd6-f6e2-429d-a7c0-462c7da0e92b
Jack, S.
3275b6b3-9f60-4901-9b2f-b03aab101638
Grocott, M.P.W.
1e87b741-513e-4a22-be13-0f7bb344e8c2
Cave, J.
fa0405c9-9597-43f6-a9f4-b9ec5fb7268f
Paschalis, A.
e7626e9f-172b-4da2-882c-bddb219f3fb6
Huang, C.Y.
c92978b9-74f2-4078-bfee-5d6ee8128e8c
West, M.
98b67e58-9875-4133-b236-8a10a0a12c04
Copson, E.
a94cdbd6-f6e2-429d-a7c0-462c7da0e92b
Jack, S.
3275b6b3-9f60-4901-9b2f-b03aab101638
Grocott, M.P.W.
1e87b741-513e-4a22-be13-0f7bb344e8c2

Cave, J., Paschalis, A., Huang, C.Y., West, M., Copson, E., Jack, S. and Grocott, M.P.W. (2018) A systematic review of the safety and efficacy of aerobic exercise during cytotoxic chemotherapy treatment. Supportive Care in Cancer, 26 (10), 3337-3351. (doi:10.1007/s00520-018-4295-x).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Purpose:

Aerobic exercise improves prognosis and quality of life (QoL) following completion of chemotherapy. However, the safety and efficacy of aerobic exercise during chemotherapy is less certain. A systematic review was performed of randomised trials of adult patients undergoing chemotherapy, comparing an exercise intervention with standard care.

Method:

From 253 abstracts screened, 33 unique trials were appraised in accordance with PRISMA guidance, including 3257 patients. Interventions included walking, jogging or cycling, and 23 were of moderate intensity (50–80% maximum heart rate).

Results:

Aerobic exercise improved, or at least maintained fitness during chemotherapy. Moderately intense exercise, up to 70–80% of maximum heart rate, was safe. Any reported adverse effects of exercise were mild and self-limiting, but reporting was inconsistent. Adherence was good (median 72%). Exercise improved QoL and physical functioning, with earlier return to work. Two out of four studies reported improved chemotherapy completion rates. Four out of six studies reported reduced chemotherapy toxicity. There was no evidence that exercise reduced myelosuppression or improved response rate or survival.

Conclusions:

Exercise during chemotherapy is safe and should be encouraged because of beneficial effects on QoL and physical functioning. More research is required to determine the impact on chemotherapy completion rates and prognosis.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 May 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 24 June 2018
Published date: October 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426114
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426114
ISSN: 0941-4355
PURE UUID: f2ba2756-2bd1-4edf-b4c9-d4396ec155d7
ORCID for A. Paschalis: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-4833-9962
ORCID for M. West: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-0345-5356

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:26

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Contributors

Author: J. Cave
Author: A. Paschalis ORCID iD
Author: C.Y. Huang
Author: M. West ORCID iD
Author: E. Copson
Author: S. Jack
Author: M.P.W. Grocott

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