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Abyssal deposit-feeding rates consistent with the metabolic theory of ecology

Abyssal deposit-feeding rates consistent with the metabolic theory of ecology
Abyssal deposit-feeding rates consistent with the metabolic theory of ecology
The Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) posits that metabolic rate controls ecological processes, such as the rate of resource uptake, from the individual‐ to the ecosystem‐scale. Metabolic rate has been found empirically to be an exponential function of whole organism body mass. We test a fundamental assumption of MTE, whether resource uptake scales to metabolism, by examining detritivores accessing a single common resource pool, an ideal study case. We used an existing empirical model of ingestion for aquatic deposit feeders adjusted for temperature to test whether ingestion by abyssal deposit feeders conforms to MTE‐predicted feeding rates. We estimated the sediment deposit‐feeding rates of large invertebrates from two abyssal study sites using time‐lapse photography, and related those rates to body mass, environmental temperature, and sediment organic matter content using this framework. Ingestion was significantly related to individual wet mass, with a mass‐scaling coefficient of 0.81, with 95% confidence intervals that encompass the MTE‐predicted value of 0.75, and the same pattern determined in other aquatic systems. Our results also provide insight into the potential mechanism through which this fundamental assumption operates. After temperature correction, both deep‐ and shallow‐water taxa might be summarized into a single mass‐scaled ingestion rate.
0012-9658
1-7
Durden, Jennifer
d7101246-b76b-44bc-8956-8ca4ae62ae1f
Bett, Brian
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Huffard, Christine L.
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Ruhl, Henry
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Smith, Kenneth L.
c282f721-59cf-4caa-a344-f4a26f6b534c
Durden, Jennifer
d7101246-b76b-44bc-8956-8ca4ae62ae1f
Bett, Brian
61342990-13be-45ae-9f5c-9540114335d9
Huffard, Christine L.
888a9c43-4643-4865-9c70-0b324f42d54b
Ruhl, Henry
177608ef-7793-4911-86cf-cd9960ff22b6
Smith, Kenneth L.
c282f721-59cf-4caa-a344-f4a26f6b534c

Durden, Jennifer, Bett, Brian, Huffard, Christine L., Ruhl, Henry and Smith, Kenneth L. (2019) Abyssal deposit-feeding rates consistent with the metabolic theory of ecology. Ecology, 100 (1), 1-7. (doi:10.1002/ecy.2564).

Record type: Article

Abstract

The Metabolic Theory of Ecology (MTE) posits that metabolic rate controls ecological processes, such as the rate of resource uptake, from the individual‐ to the ecosystem‐scale. Metabolic rate has been found empirically to be an exponential function of whole organism body mass. We test a fundamental assumption of MTE, whether resource uptake scales to metabolism, by examining detritivores accessing a single common resource pool, an ideal study case. We used an existing empirical model of ingestion for aquatic deposit feeders adjusted for temperature to test whether ingestion by abyssal deposit feeders conforms to MTE‐predicted feeding rates. We estimated the sediment deposit‐feeding rates of large invertebrates from two abyssal study sites using time‐lapse photography, and related those rates to body mass, environmental temperature, and sediment organic matter content using this framework. Ingestion was significantly related to individual wet mass, with a mass‐scaling coefficient of 0.81, with 95% confidence intervals that encompass the MTE‐predicted value of 0.75, and the same pattern determined in other aquatic systems. Our results also provide insight into the potential mechanism through which this fundamental assumption operates. After temperature correction, both deep‐ and shallow‐water taxa might be summarized into a single mass‐scaled ingestion rate.

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Deposit feeding and metabolism R1 - preprint-2 - Accepted Manuscript
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Durden et al 2019 Ecology - Version of Record
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Accepted/In Press date: 31 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 January 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426171
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426171
ISSN: 0012-9658
PURE UUID: 4e9b9d42-e88c-43b3-9f60-1b9bd66b7bb5

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Date deposited: 16 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 20 Jul 2019 04:04

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