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Investigation of feeding behaviour in C. elegans reveals distinct pharmacological and antibacterial effects of nicotine

Investigation of feeding behaviour in C. elegans reveals distinct pharmacological and antibacterial effects of nicotine
Investigation of feeding behaviour in C. elegans reveals distinct pharmacological and antibacterial effects of nicotine

Caenorhabditis elegans is an informative model to study the neural basis of feeding. A useful paradigm is one in which adult nematodes feed on a bacterial lawn which has been pre-loaded with pharmacological agents and the effect on pharyngeal pumping rate scored. A crucial aspect of this assay is the availability of good quality bacteria to stimulate pumping to maximal levels. A potential confound is the possibility that the pharmacological agent impacts bacterial viability and indirectly influences feeding rate. Here, the actions of nicotine on pharyngeal pumping of C. elegans and on the Escherichia coli bacterial food source were investigated. Nicotine caused an immediate and concentration-dependent inhibition of C. elegans pharyngeal pumping, IC50 4 mM (95% CI = 3.4 mM to 4.8 mM). At concentrations between 5 and 25 mM, nicotine also affected the growth and viability of E. coli lawns. To test whether this food depletion by nicotine caused the reduced pumping, we modified the experimental paradigm. We investigated pharyngeal pumping stimulated by 10 mM 5-HT, a food ‘mimic’, before testing if nicotine still inhibited this behaviour. The IC50 for nicotine in these assays was 2.9 mM (95% CI = 3.1 mM to 5.1 mM) indicating the depletion of food lawn does not underpin the potency of nicotine at inhibiting feeding. These studies show that the inhibitory effect of nicotine on C. elegans pharyngeal pumping is mediated by a direct effect rather than by its poorly reported bactericidal actions.

Bactericide, Caenorhabditis elegans, E. coli, Nicotine, Pharyngeal pumping
1354-2516
1-8
Kudelska, M. M.
e199754d-d0fd-4d6f-8d6f-a9295441e001
Lewis, A.
ec82fc57-cac5-4657-8cf8-29e3bef8cd64
Ng, C. T.
f60672c3-9f20-405c-a2cb-0ba677888403
Doyle, D. A.
f85f52c8-ce43-4f15-bd06-1df106f73b26
Holden-Dye, L.
8032bf60-5db6-40cb-b71c-ddda9d212c8e
O’Connor, V. M.
e94d4409-b281-49cd-a9f8-86214f7a7641
Walker, R. J.
c8fbfe1c-349d-497f-b24e-0295c84c4634
Kudelska, M. M.
e199754d-d0fd-4d6f-8d6f-a9295441e001
Lewis, A.
ec82fc57-cac5-4657-8cf8-29e3bef8cd64
Ng, C. T.
f60672c3-9f20-405c-a2cb-0ba677888403
Doyle, D. A.
f85f52c8-ce43-4f15-bd06-1df106f73b26
Holden-Dye, L.
8032bf60-5db6-40cb-b71c-ddda9d212c8e
O’Connor, V. M.
e94d4409-b281-49cd-a9f8-86214f7a7641
Walker, R. J.
c8fbfe1c-349d-497f-b24e-0295c84c4634

Kudelska, M. M., Lewis, A., Ng, C. T., Doyle, D. A., Holden-Dye, L., O’Connor, V. M. and Walker, R. J. (2018) Investigation of feeding behaviour in C. elegans reveals distinct pharmacological and antibacterial effects of nicotine. Invertebrate Neuroscience, 18 (4), 1-8. (doi:10.1007/s10158-018-0219-1).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Caenorhabditis elegans is an informative model to study the neural basis of feeding. A useful paradigm is one in which adult nematodes feed on a bacterial lawn which has been pre-loaded with pharmacological agents and the effect on pharyngeal pumping rate scored. A crucial aspect of this assay is the availability of good quality bacteria to stimulate pumping to maximal levels. A potential confound is the possibility that the pharmacological agent impacts bacterial viability and indirectly influences feeding rate. Here, the actions of nicotine on pharyngeal pumping of C. elegans and on the Escherichia coli bacterial food source were investigated. Nicotine caused an immediate and concentration-dependent inhibition of C. elegans pharyngeal pumping, IC50 4 mM (95% CI = 3.4 mM to 4.8 mM). At concentrations between 5 and 25 mM, nicotine also affected the growth and viability of E. coli lawns. To test whether this food depletion by nicotine caused the reduced pumping, we modified the experimental paradigm. We investigated pharyngeal pumping stimulated by 10 mM 5-HT, a food ‘mimic’, before testing if nicotine still inhibited this behaviour. The IC50 for nicotine in these assays was 2.9 mM (95% CI = 3.1 mM to 5.1 mM) indicating the depletion of food lawn does not underpin the potency of nicotine at inhibiting feeding. These studies show that the inhibitory effect of nicotine on C. elegans pharyngeal pumping is mediated by a direct effect rather than by its poorly reported bactericidal actions.

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Accepted/In Press date: 24 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 November 2018
Published date: 1 December 2018
Keywords: Bactericide, Caenorhabditis elegans, E. coli, Nicotine, Pharyngeal pumping

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426265
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426265
ISSN: 1354-2516
PURE UUID: 1a2180fe-4a3c-48b1-b4be-f10058a437f2
ORCID for L. Holden-Dye: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9704-1217

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Date deposited: 21 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 10 Oct 2019 00:40

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Contributors

Author: M. M. Kudelska
Author: A. Lewis
Author: C. T. Ng
Author: D. A. Doyle
Author: L. Holden-Dye ORCID iD
Author: V. M. O’Connor
Author: R. J. Walker

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