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Fluctuations in anthropogenic nighttime lights from satellite imagery for five cities in Niger and Nigeria

Fluctuations in anthropogenic nighttime lights from satellite imagery for five cities in Niger and Nigeria
Fluctuations in anthropogenic nighttime lights from satellite imagery for five cities in Niger and Nigeria

Dynamic measures of human populations are critical for global health management but are often overlooked, largely because they are difficult to quantify. Measuring human population dynamics can be prohibitively expensive in under-resourced communities. Satellite imagery can provide measurements of human populations, past and present, to complement public health analyses and interventions. We used anthropogenic illumination from publicly accessible, serial satellite nighttime images as a quantifiable proxy for seasonal population variation in five urban areas in Niger and Nigeria. We identified population fluxes as the mechanistic driver of regional seasonal measles outbreaks. Our data showed 1) urban illumination fluctuated seasonally, 2) corresponding population fluctuations were sufficient to drive seasonal measles outbreaks, and 3) overlooking these fluctuations during vaccination activities resulted in below-target coverage levels, incapable of halting transmission of the virus. We designed immunization solutions capable of achieving above-target coverage of both resident and mobile populations. Here, we provide detailed data on brightness from 2000-2005 for 5 cities in Niger and Nigeria and detailed methodology for application to other populations.

1-9
Bharti, Nita
2599876b-d215-44b4-ad2a-67460bbf7bdb
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e
Bharti, Nita
2599876b-d215-44b4-ad2a-67460bbf7bdb
Tatem, Andrew J.
6c6de104-a5f9-46e0-bb93-a1a7c980513e

Bharti, Nita and Tatem, Andrew J. (2018) Fluctuations in anthropogenic nighttime lights from satellite imagery for five cities in Niger and Nigeria. Scientific Data, 5, 1-9. (doi:10.1038/sdata.2018.256).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Dynamic measures of human populations are critical for global health management but are often overlooked, largely because they are difficult to quantify. Measuring human population dynamics can be prohibitively expensive in under-resourced communities. Satellite imagery can provide measurements of human populations, past and present, to complement public health analyses and interventions. We used anthropogenic illumination from publicly accessible, serial satellite nighttime images as a quantifiable proxy for seasonal population variation in five urban areas in Niger and Nigeria. We identified population fluxes as the mechanistic driver of regional seasonal measles outbreaks. Our data showed 1) urban illumination fluctuated seasonally, 2) corresponding population fluctuations were sufficient to drive seasonal measles outbreaks, and 3) overlooking these fluctuations during vaccination activities resulted in below-target coverage levels, incapable of halting transmission of the virus. We designed immunization solutions capable of achieving above-target coverage of both resident and mobile populations. Here, we provide detailed data on brightness from 2000-2005 for 5 cities in Niger and Nigeria and detailed methodology for application to other populations.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 27 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 13 November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426296
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426296
PURE UUID: ad5e27a7-660f-42b5-9128-3d1dc0d20202
ORCID for Andrew J. Tatem: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7270-941X

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 22 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 10 Dec 2019 01:37

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