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Encounters for foot and ankle pain in UK primary care: a population-based cohort study of CPRD data

Encounters for foot and ankle pain in UK primary care: a population-based cohort study of CPRD data
Encounters for foot and ankle pain in UK primary care: a population-based cohort study of CPRD data

BACKGROUND: Older patients who have foot pain report variation in access to services to manage their foot health. To plan services it is essential to understand the scale and burden of foot pain that exists for GPs. 

AIM: To provide UK-wide population-level data of the frequency of foot and/or ankle pain encounters recorded in general practice. 

DESIGN AND SETTING: Population-based cohort design study using data drawn from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) from January 2010 to December 2013. 

METHOD: All CPRD data were collected prospectively by participating GPs. The primary outcome was prevalence of GP encounters for foot and/or ankle pain, stratified by age, sex, and different subgroups of causes. RESULTS: A foot and/or ankle pain encounter was recorded for 346 067 patients, and there was a total of 567 095 recorded encounters (mean per person 1.6, standard deviation [SD] 1.3). The prevalence of recorded encounters of foot and/or ankle pain was 2980 per 100 000 (3%). The number of patients with a recorded encounter of foot and/or ankle pain was 1820 per 100 000 (1.8%). Foot and/or ankle pain encounters were reported across all age groups (54.4% females), with those aged 71-80 years placing the greatest burden on GPs. The most common specified referrals were to orthopaedics (n = 36 881) and physiotherapy (n = 33 987), followed by podiatry (n = 25 980). 

CONCLUSION: The burden of foot and/or ankle pain encounters recorded by GPs is not insubstantial, and spans all ages, with a high proportion of referrals to orthopaedics. The authors recommend further exploration of 'first-contact practitioners' for foot and/or ankle pain in general practice to alleviate the burden on GPs.

ankle, burden, foot, pain, prevalence
0960-1643
e422-e429
Ferguson, Rachel
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Culliford, David
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Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel
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Pinedo-Villanueva, Rafael
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Delmestri, Antonella
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Arden, Nigel
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f
Bowen, Catherine
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Ferguson, Rachel
9b78c5f4-843b-428e-969c-3f871056d538
Culliford, David
25511573-74d3-422a-b0ee-dfe60f80df87
Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel
e596722a-2f01-4201-bd9d-be3e180e76a9
Pinedo-Villanueva, Rafael
7375e99b-3bac-4210-841e-ec4724df9131
Delmestri, Antonella
c1dfbd4f-1ec0-4e02-a6fa-423f90edc322
Arden, Nigel
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f
Bowen, Catherine
fd85c3c5-96d9-49b8-86c6-caa94e1a222b

Ferguson, Rachel, Culliford, David, Prieto-Alhambra, Daniel, Pinedo-Villanueva, Rafael, Delmestri, Antonella, Arden, Nigel and Bowen, Catherine (2019) Encounters for foot and ankle pain in UK primary care: a population-based cohort study of CPRD data. British Journal of General Practice, 69 (683), e422-e429. (doi:10.3399/bjgp19X703817).

Record type: Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Older patients who have foot pain report variation in access to services to manage their foot health. To plan services it is essential to understand the scale and burden of foot pain that exists for GPs. 

AIM: To provide UK-wide population-level data of the frequency of foot and/or ankle pain encounters recorded in general practice. 

DESIGN AND SETTING: Population-based cohort design study using data drawn from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) from January 2010 to December 2013. 

METHOD: All CPRD data were collected prospectively by participating GPs. The primary outcome was prevalence of GP encounters for foot and/or ankle pain, stratified by age, sex, and different subgroups of causes. RESULTS: A foot and/or ankle pain encounter was recorded for 346 067 patients, and there was a total of 567 095 recorded encounters (mean per person 1.6, standard deviation [SD] 1.3). The prevalence of recorded encounters of foot and/or ankle pain was 2980 per 100 000 (3%). The number of patients with a recorded encounter of foot and/or ankle pain was 1820 per 100 000 (1.8%). Foot and/or ankle pain encounters were reported across all age groups (54.4% females), with those aged 71-80 years placing the greatest burden on GPs. The most common specified referrals were to orthopaedics (n = 36 881) and physiotherapy (n = 33 987), followed by podiatry (n = 25 980). 

CONCLUSION: The burden of foot and/or ankle pain encounters recorded by GPs is not insubstantial, and spans all ages, with a high proportion of referrals to orthopaedics. The authors recommend further exploration of 'first-contact practitioners' for foot and/or ankle pain in general practice to alleviate the burden on GPs.

Text
Observations of foot and ankle pain encounters reported by GPs in the UK, 2010-2013 - Accepted Manuscript
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 30 May 2019
Published date: June 2019
Keywords: ankle, burden, foot, pain, prevalence

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426375
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426375
ISSN: 0960-1643
PURE UUID: b1accae6-0fa3-4679-b68c-a6d8a2de4a69
ORCID for David Culliford: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1663-0253
ORCID for Catherine Bowen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7252-9515

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 26 Nov 2018 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 06:37

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Contributors

Author: Rachel Ferguson
Author: David Culliford ORCID iD
Author: Daniel Prieto-Alhambra
Author: Rafael Pinedo-Villanueva
Author: Antonella Delmestri
Author: Nigel Arden
Author: Catherine Bowen ORCID iD

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