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Charged particle single nanometre manufacturing

Charged particle single nanometre manufacturing
Charged particle single nanometre manufacturing
Following a brief historical summary of the way in which electron beam lithography developed out of the scanning electron microscope,
three state-of-the-art charged-particle beam nanopatterning technologies are considered. All three have been the subject of a
recently completed European Union Project entitled “Single Nanometre Manufacturing: Beyond CMOS”. Scanning helium ion
beam lithography has the advantages of virtually zero proximity effect, nanoscale patterning capability and high sensitivity in combination
with a novel fullerene resist based on the sub-nanometre C60 molecule. The shot noise-limited minimum linewidth
achieved to date is 6 nm. The second technology, focused electron induced processing (FEBIP), uses a nozzle-dispensed precursor
gas either to etch or to deposit patterns on the nanometre scale without the need for resist. The process has potential for high
throughput enhancement using multiple electron beams and a system employing up to 196 beams is under development based on a
commercial SEM platform. Among its potential applications is the manufacture of templates for nanoimprint lithography, NIL. This
is also a target application for the third and final charged particle technology, viz. field emission electron scanning probe lithography,
FE-eSPL. This has been developed out of scanning tunneling microscopy using lower-energy electrons (tens of electronvolts
rather than the tens of kiloelectronvolts of the other techniques). It has the considerable advantage of being employed without the
need for a vacuum system, in ambient air and is capable of sub-10 nm patterning using either developable resists or a self-developing
mode applicable for many polymeric resists, which is preferred. Like FEBIP it is potentially capable of massive parallelization
for applications requiring high throughput.
2190-4286
2855-2882
Prewett, Philip
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Hagen, Cornelis
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Lenk, Claudia
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Lenk, Steve
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Kaestner, Markus
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Ivanov, Tzvetan
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Ahmad, Ahmad
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Rangelow, Ivo W.
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Shi, Xiaoqing
004139e0-0381-40c5-a407-ea9865fd3c7a
Boden, Stuart
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Robinson, Alex P.G.
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Yang, Dongxu
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Hari, Sangeetha
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Scotuzzi, Marijke
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Huq, Ejaz
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Prewett, Philip
6a3a966f-5dd0-43d0-8a51-6a5f78e56b1a
Hagen, Cornelis
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Lenk, Claudia
127aff22-ef60-4c9d-ab7a-76794479a1b1
Lenk, Steve
6b809f09-3771-4143-adb5-e78bd39db529
Kaestner, Markus
bb206023-a11e-4ffa-9f07-c9e2746dda62
Ivanov, Tzvetan
7d723060-432f-4485-9988-4b6ccea0506c
Ahmad, Ahmad
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Rangelow, Ivo W.
f1d61c6f-f7f1-40b7-a0cf-ae7bceb04cac
Shi, Xiaoqing
004139e0-0381-40c5-a407-ea9865fd3c7a
Boden, Stuart
83976b65-e90f-42d1-9a01-fe9cfc571bf8
Robinson, Alex P.G.
4d2e378b-8882-406d-a2c4-f4c050af4027
Yang, Dongxu
9868a69f-a177-4437-a013-b334f49a8431
Hari, Sangeetha
78c8bc99-ef1b-45d4-9a8f-ad08bb8ec5f9
Scotuzzi, Marijke
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Huq, Ejaz
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Prewett, Philip, Hagen, Cornelis, Lenk, Claudia, Lenk, Steve, Kaestner, Markus, Ivanov, Tzvetan, Ahmad, Ahmad, Rangelow, Ivo W., Shi, Xiaoqing, Boden, Stuart, Robinson, Alex P.G., Yang, Dongxu, Hari, Sangeetha, Scotuzzi, Marijke and Huq, Ejaz (2018) Charged particle single nanometre manufacturing. Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, 9, 2855-2882. (doi:10.3762/bjnano.9.266).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Following a brief historical summary of the way in which electron beam lithography developed out of the scanning electron microscope,
three state-of-the-art charged-particle beam nanopatterning technologies are considered. All three have been the subject of a
recently completed European Union Project entitled “Single Nanometre Manufacturing: Beyond CMOS”. Scanning helium ion
beam lithography has the advantages of virtually zero proximity effect, nanoscale patterning capability and high sensitivity in combination
with a novel fullerene resist based on the sub-nanometre C60 molecule. The shot noise-limited minimum linewidth
achieved to date is 6 nm. The second technology, focused electron induced processing (FEBIP), uses a nozzle-dispensed precursor
gas either to etch or to deposit patterns on the nanometre scale without the need for resist. The process has potential for high
throughput enhancement using multiple electron beams and a system employing up to 196 beams is under development based on a
commercial SEM platform. Among its potential applications is the manufacture of templates for nanoimprint lithography, NIL. This
is also a target application for the third and final charged particle technology, viz. field emission electron scanning probe lithography,
FE-eSPL. This has been developed out of scanning tunneling microscopy using lower-energy electrons (tens of electronvolts
rather than the tens of kiloelectronvolts of the other techniques). It has the considerable advantage of being employed without the
need for a vacuum system, in ambient air and is capable of sub-10 nm patterning using either developable resists or a self-developing
mode applicable for many polymeric resists, which is preferred. Like FEBIP it is potentially capable of massive parallelization
for applications requiring high throughput.

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Accepted/In Press date: 16 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 14 November 2018
Published date: 14 November 2018

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426669
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426669
ISSN: 2190-4286
PURE UUID: f829bec7-9dc5-4bca-9b6c-498e36ed77b1
ORCID for Stuart Boden: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4232-1828

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Date deposited: 10 Dec 2018 17:30
Last modified: 14 Mar 2019 01:42

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Contributors

Author: Philip Prewett
Author: Cornelis Hagen
Author: Claudia Lenk
Author: Steve Lenk
Author: Markus Kaestner
Author: Tzvetan Ivanov
Author: Ahmad Ahmad
Author: Ivo W. Rangelow
Author: Xiaoqing Shi
Author: Stuart Boden ORCID iD
Author: Alex P.G. Robinson
Author: Dongxu Yang
Author: Sangeetha Hari
Author: Marijke Scotuzzi
Author: Ejaz Huq

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