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Selective logging causes the decline of large-sized mammals including those in unlogged patches surrounded by logged and agricultural areas

Selective logging causes the decline of large-sized mammals including those in unlogged patches surrounded by logged and agricultural areas
Selective logging causes the decline of large-sized mammals including those in unlogged patches surrounded by logged and agricultural areas

Legal and illegal logging is prevalent throughout the tropics, impacting on natural habitat and wildlife. This study aimed to investigate the sensitivity of forest mammals to selective logging in the lowland dipterocarp forests of South-West Peninsular Malaysia and identify the underlying factors that determine species occurrence. A total of 120 camera trap locations were deployed within selectively logged and unlogged forests. We found that unlogged forest had greater wildlife occurrences compared to selectively logged forests, including two endangered mammal species not found in logged forest. Forest vegetation structure characteristics such as the abundance of lianas, large trees, saplings, palms, bamboo and seedlings were associated with mammal species richness. Mammal species richness increased with number of forest trees, particularly those with a DBH of >45 cm, but this was limited to high altitude forest. Worryingly, we did not detect any large mammalian apex predators such as leopards or tigers in either unlogged or selectively logged forests. The absence of these animals may be the result of poaching, habitat degradation or other pressures; these mammals are expected to be present in intact forests in Peninsular Malaysia. Restoring logged forests and preserving the remaining unlogged lowland dipterocarp forests are critically important to safeguard mammalian biodiversity in the region. Besides that, we recommend that conventional logging practices are replaced with reduced impact logging methods.

Biodiversity, Camera trap, Deforestation, Peninsular Malaysia, Reduced impact logging, Species richness
0006-3207
40-47
Jamhuri, Jamaluddin
9ab43c06-9879-43eb-9aee-a427fa183114
Samantha, Liza D.
fa244d21-b562-4231-ac16-5bb5c64ff484
Tee, Sze Ling
b0d10686-ebc7-4648-a2ea-3f23532fd54f
Kamarudin, Norizah
fcf4df25-dbf2-489b-8309-74bebd86cb07
Ashton-Butt, Adham
327a148f-4a26-45f2-9611-6b4378134e04
Zubaid, Akbar
d4b8a6af-bebe-4f1a-a98c-5907f88fd2cb
Lechner, Alex M.
19c72359-7dc0-435c-817a-f67d4956656f
Azhar, Badrul
1b729d4a-a1a3-4a11-beab-9cf3a9cbaf4c
Jamhuri, Jamaluddin
9ab43c06-9879-43eb-9aee-a427fa183114
Samantha, Liza D.
fa244d21-b562-4231-ac16-5bb5c64ff484
Tee, Sze Ling
b0d10686-ebc7-4648-a2ea-3f23532fd54f
Kamarudin, Norizah
fcf4df25-dbf2-489b-8309-74bebd86cb07
Ashton-Butt, Adham
327a148f-4a26-45f2-9611-6b4378134e04
Zubaid, Akbar
d4b8a6af-bebe-4f1a-a98c-5907f88fd2cb
Lechner, Alex M.
19c72359-7dc0-435c-817a-f67d4956656f
Azhar, Badrul
1b729d4a-a1a3-4a11-beab-9cf3a9cbaf4c

Jamhuri, Jamaluddin, Samantha, Liza D., Tee, Sze Ling, Kamarudin, Norizah, Ashton-Butt, Adham, Zubaid, Akbar, Lechner, Alex M. and Azhar, Badrul (2018) Selective logging causes the decline of large-sized mammals including those in unlogged patches surrounded by logged and agricultural areas. Biological Conservation, 227, 40-47. (doi:10.1016/j.biocon.2018.09.004).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Legal and illegal logging is prevalent throughout the tropics, impacting on natural habitat and wildlife. This study aimed to investigate the sensitivity of forest mammals to selective logging in the lowland dipterocarp forests of South-West Peninsular Malaysia and identify the underlying factors that determine species occurrence. A total of 120 camera trap locations were deployed within selectively logged and unlogged forests. We found that unlogged forest had greater wildlife occurrences compared to selectively logged forests, including two endangered mammal species not found in logged forest. Forest vegetation structure characteristics such as the abundance of lianas, large trees, saplings, palms, bamboo and seedlings were associated with mammal species richness. Mammal species richness increased with number of forest trees, particularly those with a DBH of >45 cm, but this was limited to high altitude forest. Worryingly, we did not detect any large mammalian apex predators such as leopards or tigers in either unlogged or selectively logged forests. The absence of these animals may be the result of poaching, habitat degradation or other pressures; these mammals are expected to be present in intact forests in Peninsular Malaysia. Restoring logged forests and preserving the remaining unlogged lowland dipterocarp forests are critically important to safeguard mammalian biodiversity in the region. Besides that, we recommend that conventional logging practices are replaced with reduced impact logging methods.

Full text not available from this repository.

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 3 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 7 September 2018
Published date: 1 November 2018
Keywords: Biodiversity, Camera trap, Deforestation, Peninsular Malaysia, Reduced impact logging, Species richness

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426917
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426917
ISSN: 0006-3207
PURE UUID: 0d64eea6-ce07-4cc3-99da-b5300cffacd4

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 14 Dec 2018 17:30
Last modified: 05 Mar 2019 17:31

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