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Improving household surveys and use of data to address health inequities in three Asian cities: Protocol for the Surveys for Urban Equity (SUE) mixed methods and feasibility study

Improving household surveys and use of data to address health inequities in three Asian cities: Protocol for the Surveys for Urban Equity (SUE) mixed methods and feasibility study
Improving household surveys and use of data to address health inequities in three Asian cities: Protocol for the Surveys for Urban Equity (SUE) mixed methods and feasibility study

Introduction As rapid urbanisation transforms the sociodemographic structures within cities, standard survey methods, which have remained unchanged for many years, under-represent the urban poorest. This leads to an overly positive picture of urban health, distorting appropriate allocation of resources between rural and urban and within urban areas. Here, we present a protocol for our study which (i) tests novel methods to improve representation of urban populations in household surveys and measure mental health and injuries, (ii) explores urban poverty and compares measures of poverty and 'slumness' and (iii) works with city authorities to understand, and potentially improve, utilisation of data on urban health for planning more equitable services. Methods and analysis We will conduct household surveys in Kathmandu, Hanoi and Dhaka to test novel methods: (i) gridded population sampling; (ii) enumeration using open-access online maps and (iii) one-stage versus two-stage cluster sampling. We will test reliability of an observational tool to categorise neighbourhoods as slum areas. Within the survey, we will assess the appropriateness of a short set of questions to measure depression and injuries. Questionnaire data will also be used to compare asset-based, consumption-based and income-based measures of poverty. Participatory methods will identify perceptions of wealth in two communities in each city. The analysis will combine quantitative and qualitative findings to recommend appropriate measures of poverty in urban areas. We will conduct qualitative interviews and establish communities of practice with government staff in each city on use of data for planning. Framework approach will be used to analyse qualitative data allowing comparison across city settings. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approvals have been granted by ethics committees from the UK, Nepal, Bangladesh and Vietnam. Findings will be disseminated through conference papers, peer-reviewed open access articles and workshops with policy-makers and survey experts in Kathmandu, Hanoi and Dhaka.

city planning, depression, household survey methods, injuries, urban slum
2044-6055
Elsey, Helen
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Poudel, Ak Narayan
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Ensor, Tim
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Mirzoev, Tolib
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Newell, James Nicholas
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Hicks, Joseph Paul
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Cartwright, Christopher
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Wong, David
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Tait, Caroline
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Baral, Sushil
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Bhattarai, Radheshyam
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Khanal, Sudeepa
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Dhungel, Rajeev
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Gajurel, Subash
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Manandhar, Shraddha
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Mashreky, Saidur
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Ferdoush, Junnatul
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Huque, Rumana
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Ferdous, Tarana
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Nasreen, Shammi
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Van Minh, Hoang
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Duc, Duong Minh
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Ngoc, Bao
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Thomson, Dana
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Wallace, Hilary
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Elsey, Helen
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Poudel, Ak Narayan
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Ensor, Tim
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Mirzoev, Tolib
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Newell, James Nicholas
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Hicks, Joseph Paul
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Cartwright, Christopher
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Wong, David
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Tait, Caroline
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Baral, Sushil
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Bhattarai, Radheshyam
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Khanal, Sudeepa
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Gajurel, Subash
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Manandhar, Shraddha
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Mashreky, Saidur
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Ferdoush, Junnatul
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Huque, Rumana
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Ferdous, Tarana
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Nasreen, Shammi
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Van Minh, Hoang
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Duc, Duong Minh
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Ngoc, Bao
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Thomson, Dana
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Wallace, Hilary
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Elsey, Helen, Poudel, Ak Narayan, Ensor, Tim, Mirzoev, Tolib, Newell, James Nicholas, Hicks, Joseph Paul, Cartwright, Christopher, Wong, David, Tait, Caroline, Baral, Sushil, Bhattarai, Radheshyam, Khanal, Sudeepa, Dhungel, Rajeev, Gajurel, Subash, Manandhar, Shraddha, Mashreky, Saidur, Ferdoush, Junnatul, Huque, Rumana, Ferdous, Tarana, Nasreen, Shammi, Van Minh, Hoang, Duc, Duong Minh, Ngoc, Bao, Thomson, Dana and Wallace, Hilary (2018) Improving household surveys and use of data to address health inequities in three Asian cities: Protocol for the Surveys for Urban Equity (SUE) mixed methods and feasibility study. BMJ Open, 8 (11), [e024182]. (doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024182).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Introduction As rapid urbanisation transforms the sociodemographic structures within cities, standard survey methods, which have remained unchanged for many years, under-represent the urban poorest. This leads to an overly positive picture of urban health, distorting appropriate allocation of resources between rural and urban and within urban areas. Here, we present a protocol for our study which (i) tests novel methods to improve representation of urban populations in household surveys and measure mental health and injuries, (ii) explores urban poverty and compares measures of poverty and 'slumness' and (iii) works with city authorities to understand, and potentially improve, utilisation of data on urban health for planning more equitable services. Methods and analysis We will conduct household surveys in Kathmandu, Hanoi and Dhaka to test novel methods: (i) gridded population sampling; (ii) enumeration using open-access online maps and (iii) one-stage versus two-stage cluster sampling. We will test reliability of an observational tool to categorise neighbourhoods as slum areas. Within the survey, we will assess the appropriateness of a short set of questions to measure depression and injuries. Questionnaire data will also be used to compare asset-based, consumption-based and income-based measures of poverty. Participatory methods will identify perceptions of wealth in two communities in each city. The analysis will combine quantitative and qualitative findings to recommend appropriate measures of poverty in urban areas. We will conduct qualitative interviews and establish communities of practice with government staff in each city on use of data for planning. Framework approach will be used to analyse qualitative data allowing comparison across city settings. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approvals have been granted by ethics committees from the UK, Nepal, Bangladesh and Vietnam. Findings will be disseminated through conference papers, peer-reviewed open access articles and workshops with policy-makers and survey experts in Kathmandu, Hanoi and Dhaka.

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More information

e-pub ahead of print date: 25 November 2018
Published date: November 2018
Keywords: city planning, depression, household survey methods, injuries, urban slum

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426929
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426929
ISSN: 2044-6055
PURE UUID: 700e9652-3351-4754-8e58-11af8b4b5772
ORCID for Dana Thomson: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-9507-9123

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 18 Dec 2018 17:30
Last modified: 25 Nov 2021 19:46

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Contributors

Author: Helen Elsey
Author: Ak Narayan Poudel
Author: Tim Ensor
Author: Tolib Mirzoev
Author: James Nicholas Newell
Author: Joseph Paul Hicks
Author: Christopher Cartwright
Author: David Wong
Author: Caroline Tait
Author: Sushil Baral
Author: Radheshyam Bhattarai
Author: Sudeepa Khanal
Author: Rajeev Dhungel
Author: Subash Gajurel
Author: Shraddha Manandhar
Author: Saidur Mashreky
Author: Junnatul Ferdoush
Author: Rumana Huque
Author: Tarana Ferdous
Author: Shammi Nasreen
Author: Hoang Van Minh
Author: Duong Minh Duc
Author: Bao Ngoc
Author: Dana Thomson ORCID iD
Author: Hilary Wallace

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