The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository

Yogic breathing instruction in patients with treatment‑resistant generalized anxiety disorder: Pilot study

Yogic breathing instruction in patients with treatment‑resistant generalized anxiety disorder: Pilot study
Yogic breathing instruction in patients with treatment‑resistant generalized anxiety disorder: Pilot study
Aim: This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and effects of instruction in yogic breathing techniques (Pranayama) in patients with treatment-resistant generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in UK secondary mental health services settings.

Materials and Methods: Participants were adult primary or secondary care patients with a primary diagnosis of GAD (with or without comorbidity) and persistent anxiety symptoms of at least moderate intensity, despite prior treatment with two or more medications of proven efficacy. Patients participated in group-delivered yogic breathing training and practice for 12 weeks. Structured assessments were performed at baseline, after 1, 2, and 6 weeks of instruction, and at end-point. Participants also completed the antisaccade (emotional variant) task and startle response task at baseline and end-point.

Results: At baseline, participating patients (n = 9) had moderate-to-severe anxiety symptoms and mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms, they attended 84% of offered sessions and provided positive feedback on the content and delivery of treatment. Symptom severity reduced significantly from baseline to end-point. There were greater errors on negative trials compared to neutral trials in the antisaccade task at baseline, and a significant reduction in antisaccade errors for negative stimuli as compared to neutral stimuli between baseline and end-point: but there were no significant differences in either mean heart rate or startle response between baseline and end-point.

Limitations: The absence of a control group and small sample size.

Conclusion: Yogic breathing techniques proved simple to learn and may be beneficial in reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant GAD. Yogic breathing had no effect on autonomic arousal, but the reduction in errors to negative stimuli in the antisaccade task suggests an improvement in attention control during the intervention accompanying the reduction in symptoms.
anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, pranayama yoga, yogic breathing
0973-6131
78-83
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Tiwari, Nupur
38fa5742-e04c-4f06-9ae1-a27fbccf5975
Sutton, Michelle
e4771c5a-f261-497b-ae00-bcca3bbe79ac
Garner, Matthew
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072
Baldwin, David
1beaa192-0ef1-4914-897a-3a49fc2ed15e
Tiwari, Nupur
38fa5742-e04c-4f06-9ae1-a27fbccf5975
Sutton, Michelle
e4771c5a-f261-497b-ae00-bcca3bbe79ac
Garner, Matthew
3221c5b3-b951-4fec-b456-ec449e4ce072

Baldwin, David, Tiwari, Nupur, Sutton, Michelle and Garner, Matthew (2019) Yogic breathing instruction in patients with treatment‑resistant generalized anxiety disorder: Pilot study. International Journal of Yoga, 12 (1), 78-83. (doi:10.4103/ijoy.IJOY_22_18).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Aim: This study aims to evaluate the feasibility and effects of instruction in yogic breathing techniques (Pranayama) in patients with treatment-resistant generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in UK secondary mental health services settings.

Materials and Methods: Participants were adult primary or secondary care patients with a primary diagnosis of GAD (with or without comorbidity) and persistent anxiety symptoms of at least moderate intensity, despite prior treatment with two or more medications of proven efficacy. Patients participated in group-delivered yogic breathing training and practice for 12 weeks. Structured assessments were performed at baseline, after 1, 2, and 6 weeks of instruction, and at end-point. Participants also completed the antisaccade (emotional variant) task and startle response task at baseline and end-point.

Results: At baseline, participating patients (n = 9) had moderate-to-severe anxiety symptoms and mild-to-moderate depressive symptoms, they attended 84% of offered sessions and provided positive feedback on the content and delivery of treatment. Symptom severity reduced significantly from baseline to end-point. There were greater errors on negative trials compared to neutral trials in the antisaccade task at baseline, and a significant reduction in antisaccade errors for negative stimuli as compared to neutral stimuli between baseline and end-point: but there were no significant differences in either mean heart rate or startle response between baseline and end-point.

Limitations: The absence of a control group and small sample size.

Conclusion: Yogic breathing techniques proved simple to learn and may be beneficial in reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with treatment-resistant GAD. Yogic breathing had no effect on autonomic arousal, but the reduction in errors to negative stimuli in the antisaccade task suggests an improvement in attention control during the intervention accompanying the reduction in symptoms.

Text
Tiwari-YogicBreathe-GAD-2018 - Version of Record
Download (3MB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: August 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 11 December 2018
Published date: 1 January 2019
Keywords: anxiety disorder, generalised anxiety disorder, pranayama yoga, yogic breathing

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 426971
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/426971
ISSN: 0973-6131
PURE UUID: c0f1d699-14a4-4ee1-8f2e-997fbc0decdb

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 19 Dec 2018 17:30
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 17:43

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: David Baldwin
Author: Nupur Tiwari
Author: Michelle Sutton
Author: Matthew Garner

University divisions

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×