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Bacteria and nanosilver: the quest for optimal production

Bacteria and nanosilver: the quest for optimal production
Bacteria and nanosilver: the quest for optimal production
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have potential uses in many applications, but current chemical production methods are challenged by scalability, limited particle stability, and the use of hazardous chemicals. The biological processes present in bacteria to mitigate metallic contaminants in their environment present a potential solution to these challenges. Before commercial exploitation of this technology can be achieved, the quality of bacteriogenic AgNPs needs to be improved for certain applications. While the colloidal and morphological stabilities of biogenic AgNPs are widely regarded as superior to chemogenic particles, little control over the synthesis of particle morphologies has been achieved in biological systems. This article reviews a range of biosynthetic reaction conditions and how they affect AgNP formation in bacteria to understand which are most influential. While there remains uncertainty, some general trends are emerging: higher Ag+ concentrations result in higher AgNP production, up to a point at which the toxic effects begin to dominate; the optimal temperature appears to be heavily species-dependent and linked to the optimal growth temperature of the organism. However, hotter conditions generally favour higher production rates, while colder environments typically give greater shape diversity. Little attention has been paid to other potentially important growth conditions including halide concentrations, oxygen exposure, and irradiation with light. To fully exploit biosynthetic production routes as alternatives to chemical methods, hurdles remain with controlling particle morphologies and require further work to elucidate and harness. By better understanding the factors influencing AgNP production a foundation can be laid from which shape-controlled production can be achieved.
Biosynthesis, bacteria, silver nanoparticles, mechanism, reaction conditions
0738-8551
272-287
Mabey, Thomas
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Cristaldi, Domenico, Andrea
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Oyston, Petra
548fd471-acd3-4cc7-af99-7198c63258c4
Lymer, Karl
678ccba7-4cb6-4a4d-bf30-3c885684f1fd
Stulz, Eugen
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Wilks, Sandra
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Keevil, Charles
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Zhang, Xunli
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Mabey, Thomas
85bd72ae-ada4-4235-b4d9-c80407e6bdc5
Cristaldi, Domenico, Andrea
6da2333e-3305-4a8b-996f-e5a844c69cdc
Oyston, Petra
548fd471-acd3-4cc7-af99-7198c63258c4
Lymer, Karl
678ccba7-4cb6-4a4d-bf30-3c885684f1fd
Stulz, Eugen
9a6c04cf-32ca-442b-9281-bbf3d23c622d
Wilks, Sandra
86c1f41a-12b3-451c-9245-b1a21775e993
Keevil, Charles
cb7de0a7-ce33-4cfa-af52-07f99e5650eb
Zhang, Xunli
d7cf1181-3276-4da1-9150-e212b333abb1

Mabey, Thomas, Cristaldi, Domenico, Andrea, Oyston, Petra, Lymer, Karl, Stulz, Eugen, Wilks, Sandra, Keevil, Charles and Zhang, Xunli (2019) Bacteria and nanosilver: the quest for optimal production. Critical Reviews in Biotechnology, 39 (2), 272-287. (doi:10.1080/07388551.2018.1555130).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have potential uses in many applications, but current chemical production methods are challenged by scalability, limited particle stability, and the use of hazardous chemicals. The biological processes present in bacteria to mitigate metallic contaminants in their environment present a potential solution to these challenges. Before commercial exploitation of this technology can be achieved, the quality of bacteriogenic AgNPs needs to be improved for certain applications. While the colloidal and morphological stabilities of biogenic AgNPs are widely regarded as superior to chemogenic particles, little control over the synthesis of particle morphologies has been achieved in biological systems. This article reviews a range of biosynthetic reaction conditions and how they affect AgNP formation in bacteria to understand which are most influential. While there remains uncertainty, some general trends are emerging: higher Ag+ concentrations result in higher AgNP production, up to a point at which the toxic effects begin to dominate; the optimal temperature appears to be heavily species-dependent and linked to the optimal growth temperature of the organism. However, hotter conditions generally favour higher production rates, while colder environments typically give greater shape diversity. Little attention has been paid to other potentially important growth conditions including halide concentrations, oxygen exposure, and irradiation with light. To fully exploit biosynthetic production routes as alternatives to chemical methods, hurdles remain with controlling particle morphologies and require further work to elucidate and harness. By better understanding the factors influencing AgNP production a foundation can be laid from which shape-controlled production can be achieved.

Text
Bacteria and nanosilver Revised-Final BBTN-2018-0132 - Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only until 24 October 2019.
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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 24 October 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 2 January 2019
Published date: March 2019
Keywords: Biosynthesis, bacteria, silver nanoparticles, mechanism, reaction conditions

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427051
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427051
ISSN: 0738-8551
PURE UUID: 5d471a37-f2e8-45d5-8ae2-a4fa17ef8058
ORCID for Eugen Stulz: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-5302-2276
ORCID for Sandra Wilks: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-4134-9415
ORCID for Charles Keevil: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0003-1917-7706

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 21 Dec 2018 16:30
Last modified: 05 Apr 2019 00:36

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