The University of Southampton
University of Southampton Institutional Repository
Warning ePrints Soton is experiencing an issue with some file downloads not being available. We are working hard to fix this. Please bear with us.

Prognostic information for people with MS: Impossible or inevitable?

Prognostic information for people with MS: Impossible or inevitable?
Prognostic information for people with MS: Impossible or inevitable?
Delivering prognostic information is a challenging issue in medicine and has been largely neglected in the past. A major reason has been a suspected nocebo effect of pessimistic estimates, although this is largely unproven. Among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a strong unmet need to receive long-term prognostic information. This viewpoint discusses reasons for this blind spot in physicians' attitude, foremost among which is the uncertainty of prognostic estimates. Possible strategies to move forward include tools to identify matching patients from large well-defined databases, to deliver an evidence-based individualized estimate of long-term prognosis, and its confidence interval, in a clinical setting.
1352-4585
Heesen, Christoph
689dc041-c97d-4d1b-96d8-68efbe77c254
Scalfari, Antonio
77dd66d6-0482-41a1-ac79-fd23cea1af7f
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b
Heesen, Christoph
689dc041-c97d-4d1b-96d8-68efbe77c254
Scalfari, Antonio
77dd66d6-0482-41a1-ac79-fd23cea1af7f
Galea, Ian
66209a2f-f7e6-4d63-afe4-e9299f156f0b

Heesen, Christoph, Scalfari, Antonio and Galea, Ian (2018) Prognostic information for people with MS: Impossible or inevitable? Multiple Sclerosis Journal. (doi:10.1177/1352458518807101).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Delivering prognostic information is a challenging issue in medicine and has been largely neglected in the past. A major reason has been a suspected nocebo effect of pessimistic estimates, although this is largely unproven. Among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a strong unmet need to receive long-term prognostic information. This viewpoint discusses reasons for this blind spot in physicians' attitude, foremost among which is the uncertainty of prognostic estimates. Possible strategies to move forward include tools to identify matching patients from large well-defined databases, to deliver an evidence-based individualized estimate of long-term prognosis, and its confidence interval, in a clinical setting.

Text
Heesen et al 2018_accepted - Accepted Manuscript
Download (77kB)

More information

Accepted/In Press date: 20 September 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 16 October 2018
Additional Information: I was not correspondig author. I had not seen final proofs. I realized today this article had been e-published ahead of print on 18/10/18 with my wrong institutional credentials. I have written to the journal and corresponding author to request rectification.

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427103
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427103
ISSN: 1352-4585
PURE UUID: 1820acb0-b006-43be-9ff4-3322b436c4e0
ORCID for Ian Galea: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-1268-5102

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 03 Jan 2019 10:27
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 02:47

Export record

Altmetrics

Contributors

Author: Christoph Heesen
Author: Antonio Scalfari
Author: Ian Galea ORCID iD

Download statistics

Downloads from ePrints over the past year. Other digital versions may also be available to download e.g. from the publisher's website.

View more statistics

Atom RSS 1.0 RSS 2.0

Contact ePrints Soton: eprints@soton.ac.uk

ePrints Soton supports OAI 2.0 with a base URL of http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/cgi/oai2

This repository has been built using EPrints software, developed at the University of Southampton, but available to everyone to use.

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive cookies on the University of Southampton website.

×