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Rating system in healthcare: contradictions and conflicts in an English hospital

Rating system in healthcare: contradictions and conflicts in an English hospital
Rating system in healthcare: contradictions and conflicts in an English hospital
The changing context in the New Labour Government policy and legislation to deliver healthcare
introduced in England in 1999 reflected a discontinuity in the way that the healthcare organisations are
controlled and this represented a new experience for the National Health Services (NHS). This paper
examines empirically the effects of the introduction of a compulsory set of performance measures on
the management processes of a particular English hospital. It demonstrates the complexities involved
in using performance indicators to control activities in health care organisations. It explicates the
course of change experienced by a particular organisation by highlighting both the intended and
unintended outcomes associated with the pressure to change to meet the demands of a specific set of
key targets. This case-study based research indicates that there is the need to pay a close attention to
the way that the local-level healthcare organisations are interacting. The theoretically language
adopted is informed by Broadbent and Laughlin (2005)’s analysis of organisational change, which
draws on Laughlin (1991) and some aspects of Habermas’ (1987) critical theory.
public sector reforms, organisational change, rating system in healthcare
CRAAG-06-04
University of Southampton
Agrizzi, Dila
bf4dd7b5-e685-45ca-90d8-a3e00a232401
Agrizzi, Dila
bf4dd7b5-e685-45ca-90d8-a3e00a232401

Agrizzi, Dila (2006) Rating system in healthcare: contradictions and conflicts in an English hospital (Discussion Papers in Centre for Research in Accounting, Accountability and Governance Working Papers, CRAAG-06-04) Southampton, UK. University of Southampton 27pp.

Record type: Monograph (Project Report)

Abstract

The changing context in the New Labour Government policy and legislation to deliver healthcare
introduced in England in 1999 reflected a discontinuity in the way that the healthcare organisations are
controlled and this represented a new experience for the National Health Services (NHS). This paper
examines empirically the effects of the introduction of a compulsory set of performance measures on
the management processes of a particular English hospital. It demonstrates the complexities involved
in using performance indicators to control activities in health care organisations. It explicates the
course of change experienced by a particular organisation by highlighting both the intended and
unintended outcomes associated with the pressure to change to meet the demands of a specific set of
key targets. This case-study based research indicates that there is the need to pay a close attention to
the way that the local-level healthcare organisations are interacting. The theoretically language
adopted is informed by Broadbent and Laughlin (2005)’s analysis of organisational change, which
draws on Laughlin (1991) and some aspects of Habermas’ (1987) critical theory.

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More information

Published date: 2006
Keywords: public sector reforms, organisational change, rating system in healthcare

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 42712
URI: https://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/42712
PURE UUID: dbda6929-66b4-4148-afae-abe27d2f245a

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Date deposited: 16 Jan 2007
Last modified: 13 Mar 2019 21:11

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