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Prevalence of foot pain across an international consortium of population-based cohorts

Prevalence of foot pain across an international consortium of population-based cohorts
Prevalence of foot pain across an international consortium of population-based cohorts
Objective: despite the potential burden of foot pain, some of the most fundamental epidemiological questions surrounding the foot remain poorly explored. The prevalence of foot pain has proved difficult to compare across existing studies due to variations in case definitions. The objective of this study was to use original data to explore differences in case definitions and create a single harmonised definition to investigate the prevalence of foot pain in a number of international population-based cohorts.

Methods: foot pain variables were examined in five cohorts (the Chingford Women Study, the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, the Framingham Foot Study, the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot and the North West Adelaide Health Study). One foot pain question was chosen from each cohort based on its similarity to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) pain question.

Results: the precise definition of foot pain varied between the cohorts. The prevalence of foot pain ranged from 13 to 36% and was lowest within the cohort that used a case definition specific to pain, compared to the four remaining cohorts that included components of pain, aching or stiffness. Foot pain was generally more prevalent in women, the obese and generally increased with age, being much lower in younger participants (20-44 years).

Conclusion: foot pain is common and is associated with female sex, older age and obesity. The prevalence of foot pain is likely affected by the case definition used, therefore consideration must be given for future population studies to use consistent measures of data collection.
0893-7524
661-670
Gates, Lucy
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Arden, Nigel K.
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Hannan, Marian T.
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Roddy, Edward
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Gill, Tiffany K.
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Hill, Catherine
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Dufour, Alyssa B.
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Rathod‐Mistry, Trishna
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Thomas, Martin J.
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Menz, Hylton B.
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Bowen, Catherine
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Golightly, Yvonne M.
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Gates, Lucy
bc67b8b8-110b-4358-8e1b-6f1d345bd503
Arden, Nigel K.
23af958d-835c-4d79-be54-4bbe4c68077f
Hannan, Marian T.
33dedd86-72df-4e74-99a2-17cc044bd883
Roddy, Edward
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Gill, Tiffany K.
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Hill, Catherine
3f89c093-0922-4560-868f-1668d4a04416
Dufour, Alyssa B.
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Rathod‐Mistry, Trishna
4e06e9a3-ca3d-46d9-941d-3f30a83fd04d
Thomas, Martin J.
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Menz, Hylton B.
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Bowen, Catherine
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Golightly, Yvonne M.
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Gates, Lucy, Arden, Nigel K., Hannan, Marian T., Roddy, Edward, Gill, Tiffany K., Hill, Catherine, Dufour, Alyssa B., Rathod‐Mistry, Trishna, Thomas, Martin J., Menz, Hylton B., Bowen, Catherine and Golightly, Yvonne M. (2019) Prevalence of foot pain across an international consortium of population-based cohorts. Arthritis Care & Research, 71 (5), 661-670. (doi:10.1002/acr.23829).

Record type: Article

Abstract

Objective: despite the potential burden of foot pain, some of the most fundamental epidemiological questions surrounding the foot remain poorly explored. The prevalence of foot pain has proved difficult to compare across existing studies due to variations in case definitions. The objective of this study was to use original data to explore differences in case definitions and create a single harmonised definition to investigate the prevalence of foot pain in a number of international population-based cohorts.

Methods: foot pain variables were examined in five cohorts (the Chingford Women Study, the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, the Framingham Foot Study, the Clinical Assessment Study of the Foot and the North West Adelaide Health Study). One foot pain question was chosen from each cohort based on its similarity to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) pain question.

Results: the precise definition of foot pain varied between the cohorts. The prevalence of foot pain ranged from 13 to 36% and was lowest within the cohort that used a case definition specific to pain, compared to the four remaining cohorts that included components of pain, aching or stiffness. Foot pain was generally more prevalent in women, the obese and generally increased with age, being much lower in younger participants (20-44 years).

Conclusion: foot pain is common and is associated with female sex, older age and obesity. The prevalence of foot pain is likely affected by the case definition used, therefore consideration must be given for future population studies to use consistent measures of data collection.

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More information

Accepted/In Press date: 18 December 2018
e-pub ahead of print date: 28 December 2018
Published date: May 2019

Identifiers

Local EPrints ID: 427284
URI: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/id/eprint/427284
ISSN: 0893-7524
PURE UUID: fe7e3630-301e-4ffe-a0c1-31f90da63a2d
ORCID for Lucy Gates: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-8627-3418
ORCID for Catherine Bowen: ORCID iD orcid.org/0000-0002-7252-9515

Catalogue record

Date deposited: 10 Jan 2019 17:30
Last modified: 26 Nov 2021 05:51

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Contributors

Author: Lucy Gates ORCID iD
Author: Nigel K. Arden
Author: Marian T. Hannan
Author: Edward Roddy
Author: Tiffany K. Gill
Author: Catherine Hill
Author: Alyssa B. Dufour
Author: Trishna Rathod‐Mistry
Author: Martin J. Thomas
Author: Hylton B. Menz
Author: Catherine Bowen ORCID iD
Author: Yvonne M. Golightly

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